Trump Finds New Way To Restrict Travel From Middle East With Electronics Ban For Region's Airlines

Forbes - Tech

As more details emerge about the'electronics ban' imposed by the U.S. on a raft of Middle East airlines, it increasingly looks like a crude attempt to damage those airlines and dissuade people from traveling to the U.S. from the Middle East. News first emerged on March 20 of a new regulation barring passengers from bringing any electronics device larger than a cell phone into the cabin on non-stop flights from the Middle East to the U.S. Since then, further details have been revealed. No on-the-record statements have yet been made by administration officials, but the broad terms of the ban have been set out in anonymous briefings to the media. The routes affected are direct flights to the U.S. from Amman in Jordan; Cairo in Egypt; Istanbul in Turkey; Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia; Kuwait City in Kuwait; Doha in Qatar; Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates; and Casablanca in Morocco. The airlines that fly from these airports to the U.S. are Royal Jordanian, Egypt Air, Turkish Airlines, Saudia, Kuwait Airways, Qatar Airways, Emirates, Etihad and Royal Air Maroc.


Electronic devices banned on US-bound flights from 8 countries

New Scientist

Passengers travelling to the US on flights from eight different countries will be banned from carrying laptops, iPads, cameras and most other electronics in their carry-on luggage. The reason for the ban is not immediately clear. The ban was revealed on Monday in statements from Royal Jordanian Airlines and the official news agency of Saudi Arabia. It will apply to non-stop flights to the US from 10 international airports serving the cities of Cairo in Egypt; Amman in Jordan; Kuwait City in Kuwait; Casablanca in Morocco; Doha in Qatar; Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia; Istanbul in Turkey; and Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, according to a US official. Royal Jordanian said mobile phones and medical devices were excluded from the ban.


DHS chief hints laptop ban may not be extended right now

AP World Headlines

WASHINGTON (AP) -- It may not be necessary to expand a ban on laptops and other large electronics in the cabins of many international flights into the United States right now, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said Tuesday. Homeland Security first banned laptops and other large electronics from the cabins of flights headed to the United States from 10 cities in March amid concerns about an undisclosed threat described only as sophisticated and ongoing. The current ban applies to nonstop flights to the United States from Amman, Jordan; Kuwait City, Kuwait; Cairo; Istanbul; Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Casablanca, Morocco; Doha, Qatar; and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. An electronics ban affecting nonstop flights from Europe would impact as many as 400 daily flights carrying about 85,000 passengers.


Officials say no new threats tied to airline electronics curbs; Canada may follow suit

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON/OTTAWA – U.S. and British officials said Tuesday the decision to bar laptops and tablets from the cabins of some international flights wasn't based on any specific threat but on longstanding concerns about terrorists targeting jetliners. Unimpressed, some travelers and civil liberties groups denounced the ban, raising concerns that included lost worktime on long flights and worries that checking laptops in baggage will make them more vulnerable to theft. Under the new bans, electronic devices larger than smartphones, such as laptops, tablets and gaming devices, will have to be checked on some international flights. American officials announced the U.S. ban early Tuesday, and the British followed later in the day after discussions between the countries. The U.S. ban affects flights from Amman, Jordan; Kuwait City, Kuwait; Cairo; Istanbul; Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Casablanca, Morocco; Doha, Qatar, and Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates.


Laptop Ban Could Cost Middle East Airlines, International Travelers, To The Benefit Of European Carriers

International Business Times

Following a Monday ban by security agencies in the U.S. and U.K. on large electronics in cabins on flights from several countries in the Middle East, analysts predicted carriers whose hubs were subject to the ban, such as Qatar Airways and Emirates, might find themselves with empty business class seats, while European airlines such as British Airways and Lufthansa, could capitalize on their losses. "Hubs that don't impede the productivity of long-haul business travelers," like Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris and London's Heathrow Airport, by allowing them to work on their laptops during flights would likely charge higher prices "at the expense of the Middle East," J. P. Morgan airline expert Jamie Baker told CNN, which compiled a list of the airlines that would fare the worst. Under the U.S. ban--which involved 10 international airports in or near Kuwait City, Amman, Cairo, Istanbul, Casablanca, Doha, Dubai, Abu Dhabi and the Saudi Arabian cities of Jeddah and Riyadh--the airlines Egyptair, Royal Jordanian, Saudia and Turkish Airlines would be hit hardest, according to the broadcaster. The "tech-heavy corridor between the U.S. and India," which often involves layovers or transfers in the Middle East, would be a major area of lost business for the airlines in the region covered by the new security measures, Baker added. The International Air Transport Association predicted that India will host the fastest-growing air national travel market over the next couple of decades, according to a 2015 report.