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Counterterrorism expert: Small healthcare companies are the new ransomware targets

#artificialintelligence

Hackers whose favorite weapon is the RYUK virus have shifted their focus to small and medium sized healthcare systems, according to a cybersecurity expert. MonsterCloud CEO Zohar Pinhasi said his firm has seen an increase in calls from healthcare companies of up to 500% over the last few months. "They are now exclusively targeting small and medium-sized businesses with ransoms of $100,000 to $300,000," he said. Pinhasi, is the founder of MonsterCloud, a company that specializes in removing ransomware, restoring encrypted files, and preventing organizations from becoming ransomware victims a second time. He said many small businesses can't afford to pay the ransom or to bring in professional assistance to recover.


Counterterrorism expert: Small healthcare companies are the new ransomware targets

#artificialintelligence

Hackers whose favorite weapon is the RYUK virus have shifted their focus to small and medium sized healthcare systems, according to a cybersecurity expert. MonsterCloud CEO Zohar Pinhasi said his firm has seen an increase in calls from healthcare companies of up to 500% over the last few months. "They are now exclusively targeting small and medium-sized businesses with ransoms of $100,000 to $300,000," he said. Pinhasi, is the founder of MonsterCloud, a company that specializes in removing ransomware, restoring encrypted files, and preventing organizations from becoming ransomware victims a second time. He said many small businesses can't afford to pay the ransom or to bring in professional assistance to recover.


Ransomware gangs are changing targets again. That could make them even more of a threat

ZDNet

The coronavirus pandemic has forced most organisations to rethink how they work. And it appears now that even cybercrooks and ransomware gangs are having to adapt their behaviour to adjust to the ongoing virus crisis. Phishing attacks using coronavirus as a lure have grown rapidly in recent months as malicious hackers look to use it as a means of tricking victims into giving up usernames and passwords, personal information and bank details. And there is some evidence that ransomware groups have increased their attacks aimed at staff newly working from home. Some have even been launching ransomware attacks against hospitals, medical research facilities and other important healthcare operations, at a time when they're needed more than ever.


Inside Ireland's Public Healthcare Ransomware Scare

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The consulting firm PricewaterhouseCoopers recently published lessons learned from the disruptive and costly ransomware attack in May 2021 on Ireland's public health system. The unusually candid post-mortem found that nearly two months elapsed between the initial intrusion and the launching of the ransomware. It also found affected hospitals had tens of thousands of outdated Windows 7 systems, and that the health system's IT administrators failed to respond to multiple warning signs that a massive attack was imminent. Ireland's Health Service Executive (HSE), which operates the country's public health system, got hit with Conti ransomware on May 14, 2021. A timeline in the report (above) says the initial infection of the "patient zero" workstation happened on Mar. 18, 2021, when an employee on a Windows computer opened a booby-trapped Microsoft Excel document in a phishing email that had been sent two days earlier.


It's time to stop ransomware in its tracks - Help Net Security

#artificialintelligence

Only 16% of organizations have reported no security incident types related to phishing and ransomware in the past 12 months. That's according to a survey done by Osterman Research. For most of us, though, phishing, particularly ransomware, has become an all-encompassing worry. The story of the healthcare system in Ireland, which was hit with a sophisticated ransomware attack that affected over 2,000 patient-facing IT systems and 80,000 devices, is instructive. Thousands of appointments, cancer treatments and surgeries have been delayed or canceled.