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Being a chatterbox around your children 'boosts their IQ and increases their cognitive skills'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Being a chatterbox could boost your child's intelligence, according to new research. It found youngsters exposed to large amounts of speech by their parents had higher IQs and better cognitive skills. The children, aged two to four, also tended to have better non-verbal skills such as reasoning, numeracy and shape awareness. Additionally, the study found children who interacted with adults that used a diverse vocabulary knew a greater variety of words themselves. Researchers suggest greater exposure to language forces youngsters to learn what words and phrases mean.


Humans are biologically wired to categorise colours

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Humans are biologically wired to categorise colours in certain ways, new research has found. The study indicates that babies aged between four and six months consistently divide colours up into red, blue, green, yellow and purple. But the research is controversial, as others claim that culture, specifically language, is the key driving factor to how we group colours. Humans are genetically wired to categorise colours in certain ways, new research has found. Humans see colour using the light-sensitive cone cells in their eyes, which can sense either long, short or medium wavelengths of light.


Baby talk evolved to make parents seem less intimidating

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you're guilty of talking to your baby in a silly voice, you should blame your caveman ancestors, new research suggests. Researchers have found that'baby talk' - speaking to your child in a high pitched voice while using simplistic language - could be a hang-up of early human evolution. Our ancestors may have originally spoken in a childish voice to appear less intimidating to their babies. And because this peculiar habit made it easier for babies to learn their first language, it soon became ingrained in our DNA, scientists have suggested. Researchers have found that'baby talk' - speaking to your child in a high pitched voice while using simplistic language - could be a hang-up of early human evolution (stock image) The researchers studied the movements that mothers make with their lips and tongue while talking to their babies to decipher the origins of baby talk.


Babies develop language abilities faster if their parents 'engage in a conversation' with them

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Parents who'engage in conversation' with their babies can help improve their language development faster than simply talking when they are in the room. Researchers from Stanford University and others studied the brains of babies aged between five and eight months while they slept inside an MRI machine. Rather than simply overhearing adult words, parents who take it in turns to have'conversations' with their babies can shape their future language abilities, they found. Scientists say that the brain's language networks may develop in two stages - in the womb they develop processing networks to process sound, then another network once they are a few months old to understand more complex language. The amount and quality of the language babies are exposed to has a significant affect on their future language abilities, lead author Lucy King wrote.


Babies exposed to two languages prefer baby talk, study finds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It's something that many parents do without thinking, but if you use'baby talk' with your child, you may unknowingly be helping them to learn. A new study has revealed that babies really do prefer baby talk, and pay more attention to its exaggerated, sing-song tones. While previous research has shown that monolingual babies prefer baby talk, the new study found that it is also the case for babies exposed to two languages. Not only is it good to speak baby talk to engage an infant and help them learn, parents can use baby talk in two languages without making their offspring confused, the research reveals. Babies will pay more attention to baby talk than regular speech, regardless of which languages they're used to hearing, according to a study by UCLA's Language Acquisition Lab and 16 other labs around the world Baby talk is a certain style of speech employed by adults when talking to an infant.