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Position and Perspective of Privacy Laws in India

AAAI Conferences

With robust growth and comparatively stable economy, India continues to be a key and fast developing market across the world. The number of foreign companies operating in India grows 100% every year. Yet India is still to embark upon a law that matches to developed nations’ legal system and meets investors’ expectations. However, the courts in India have used existing laws to afford protection and confer rights to secure a fair privacy to everyone.


The Liability Problem for Autonomous Artificial Agents

AAAI Conferences

This paper describes and frames a central ethical issue–the liability problem–facing the regulation of artificial computational agents, including artificial intelligence (AI) and robotic systems, as they become increasingly autonomous, and supersede current capabilities. While it frames the issue in legal terms of liability and culpability, these terms are deeply imbued and interconnected with their ethical and moral correlate–responsibility. In order for society to benefit from advances in AI technology, it will be necessary to develop regulatory policies which manage the risk and liability of deploying systems with increasingly autonomous capabilities. However, current approaches to liability have difficulties when it comes to dealing with autonomous artificial agents because their behavior may be unpredictable to those who create and deploy them, and they will not be proper legal or moral agents. This problem is the motivation for a research project that will explore the fundamental concepts of autonomy, agency and liability; clarify the different varieties of agency that artificial systems might realize, including causal, legal and moral; and the illuminate the relationships between these. The paper will frame the problem of liability in autonomous agents, sketch out its relation to fundamental concepts in human legal and moral agency–including autonomy, agency, causation, intention, responsibility and culpability–and their applicability or inapplicability to autonomous artificial agents.


Artificial Intelligence and Robotics: Who's Liable for the decisions made?

#artificialintelligence

Reuters news agency reported on 16th February 2017 that "European lawmakers called...for EU-wide legislation to regulate the rise of robots, including an ethical framework for their development and deployment and the establishment of liability for the actions of robots including self-driving cars." The question of determining'liability' for decision making achieved by robots or artificial intelligence is an interesting and important subject as the implementation of this technology increases in industry, and starts to more directly impact our day to day lives. Indeed, as application of Artificial Intelligence and machine learning technology grows, we are likely to witness how it changes the nature of work, businesses, industries and society. And yet, although it has the power to disrupt and drive greater efficiencies, AI has its obstacles: the issue of'who is liable when something goes awry' being one of them. Like many protagonists in industry, Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are trying to tackle this liability question.


Artificial Intelligence and Robotics: Who's Liable for the decisions made?

#artificialintelligence

Reuters news agency reported on 16th February 2017 that "European lawmakers called...for EU-wide legislation to regulate the rise of robots, including an ethical framework for their development and deployment and the establishment of liability for the actions of robots including self-driving cars." The question of determining'liability' for decision making achieved by robots or artificial intelligence is an interesting and important subject as the implementation of this technology increases in industry, and starts to more directly impact our day to day lives. Indeed, as application of Artificial Intelligence and machine learning technology grows, we are likely to witness how it changes the nature of work, businesses, industries and society. And yet, although it has the power to disrupt and drive greater efficiencies, AI has its obstacles: the issue of'who is liable when something goes awry' being one of them. Like many protagonists in industry, Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are trying to tackle this liability question.


Artificial Intelligence and Legal Liability

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A recent issue of a popular computing journal asked which laws would apply if a self-driving car killed a pedestrian. This paper considers the question of legal liability for artificially intelligent computer systems. It discusses whether criminal liability could ever apply; to whom it might apply; and, under civil law, whether an AI program is a product that is subject to product design legislation or a service to which the tort of negligence applies. The issue of sales warranties is also considered. A discussion of some of the practical limitations that AI systems are subject to is also included.