Building Brains: How Pearson Plans To Automate Education With AI

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On a balmy summer's day in San Francisco, Milena Marinova is sitting on the roof terrace of the offices of Pearson, a company in the midst of a radical transformation from publishing powerhouse to digital-education platform, wrapped in a gray shawl and explaining how she plans to build advanced, deep-learning algorithms that could educate the next generation of students. This is no easy task. With millions of students using its education-software, Pearson has amassed "terrabytes" of data from student homework and even textbooks that have been digitized, data that Marinova is now pulling together to build software that can automatically give students feedback on their work like a teacher would. Instead of just telling them that an answer is right or wrong, a future update to Pearson's math homework tool will give more detailed feedback on how they went wrong in the steps taken to get an answer, Marinova told Forbes in an interview. Pearson is starting with math because the topic is relatively easy to structure and digitize.


Did you know Andrew NG the pioneer of machine learning and deep learning online courses

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Andrew Yan-Tak Ng (Chinese: 吳恩達; born 1976) is a Chinese-American computer scientist and statistician, focusing on machine learning and AI. Also a business executive and investor in the Silicon Valley, Ng co-founded and led Google Brain and was a former Vice President and Chief Scientist at Baidu, building the company's Artificial Intelligence Group into a team of several thousand people. Ng is an adjunct professor at Stanford University (formerly associate professor and Director of its AI Lab). Also a pioneer in online education, Ng co-founded Coursera and deeplearning.ai. With his online courses, he has successfully spearheaded many efforts to "democratize deep learning."


GritNet 2: Real-Time Student Performance Prediction with Domain Adaptation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Increasingly fast development and update cycle of online course contents, and diverse demographics of students in each online classroom, make student performance prediction in real-time (before the course finishes) an interesting topic for both industrial research and practical needs. In that, we tackle the problem of real-time student performance prediction with on-going courses in domain adaptation framework, which is a system trained on students' labeled outcome from one previous coursework but is meant to be deployed on another. In particular, we first review recently-developed GritNet architecture which is the current state of the art for student performance prediction problem, and introduce a new unsupervised domain adaptation method to transfer a GritNet trained on a past course to a new course without any (students' outcome) label. Our results for real Udacity students' graduation predictions show that the GritNet not only generalizes well from one course to another across different Nanodegree programs, but enhances real-time predictions explicitly in the first few weeks when accurate predictions are most challenging.


Deep Learning to Predict Student Outcomes

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The increasingly fast development cycle for online course contents, along with the diverse student demographics in each online classroom, make real-time student outcomes prediction an interesting topic for both industrial research and practical needs. In this paper, we tackle the problem of real-time student performance prediction in an on-going course using a domain adaptation framework. This framework is a system trained on labeled student outcome data from previous coursework but is meant to be deployed on another course. In particular, we introduce a GritNet architecture, and develop an unsupervised domain adaptation method to transfer a GritNet trained on a past course to a new course without any student outcome label. Our results for real Udacity student graduation predictions show that the GritNet not only generalizes well from one course to another across different Nanodegree programs, but also enhances real-time predictions explicitly in the first few weeks when accurate predictions are most challenging.