Coronavirus pushes robots to front lines of China's hospitals

The Japan Times

HONG KONG – The deadly coronavirus outbreak, which has pushed the Chinese medical community into overdrive, has also prompted the country's hospitals to more quickly adopt robots as medical assistants. Telepresence bots that allow remote video communication, patient health monitoring and safe delivery of medical goods are growing in number on hospital floors in urban China. They are now acting as safe go-betweens that help curb the spread of the coronavirus. Keenon Robotics Co., a Shanghai-based company, deployed 16 robots of a model nicknamed "Little Peanut" to a hospital in Hangzhou after a group of Wuhan travelers to Singapore were held in quarantine. Siasun Robot and Automation Co. donated seven medical robots and 14 catering robots to the Shenyang Red Cross to help hospitals combat the virus on Wednesday, according to a media release on the company's website.


Artificial Intelligence Can Now Detect Brain Tumor and Lung Diseases

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After revolutionizing various industry sectors, the introduction of artificial intelligence in healthcare is transforming how we diagnose and treat critical disorders. A team of experts in the Laboratory for Respiratory Diseases at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, trained an AI-based computer algorithm using good quality data. Dr. Marko Topalovic, a postdoctoral researcher in the team, announced that AI was found to be more consistent and accurate in interpreting respiratory test results and in suggesting diagnoses, as compared to lung specialists. Likewise, Artificial Intelligence Research Centre for Neurological Disorders at the Beijing Tiantan Hospital and a research team from the Capital Medical University developed the BioMind AI system, which correctly diagnosed brain tumor in 87% of 225 cases in about 15 minutes, whereas the results of a team of 15 senior doctors displayed only 66% accuracy. The introduction of technologies such as deep learning and artificial intelligence in healthcare can help achieve more efficiency and precision.


Smart 5G Patrol Robots Deployed To Fight Coronavirus

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If a high temperature or the absence of a mask is detected, the robots send an alert to the relevant authorities. All data can be transmitted to a centralised control center for real-time situational response and decision making. Moreover, although these robots are self-driving machines, they can also be controlled remotely, thereby saving manpower by reducing patrolling responsibilities and preventing cross-infection. These next-generation 5G patrol robots have already been spotted at airports and shopping malls in the cities of Guangzhou, Shanghai, Xi'an and Guiyang.


Taiwan Startups Win Singularity University's First APAC Global Impact Challenge - Fintech Hong Kong

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Singularity University just concluded their very first APAC Global Impact Challenge (GIC), and two Taiwanese startups have emerged as winners. The challenge aimed to discover moonshot innovations and startups that positively impact the lives of people living in the Asia Pacific, specifically with an ability to scale and impact a billion of people in a decade. Participants were tasked with developing Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications to address global issues posing a threat to sustainability. AI solutions could tackle issues ranging from energy, environment, food, water, disaster resilience, governance, and health, among other things. One of its Taiwanese winners is a startup named Vibrasee, which uses deep learning to determine the early onset of Parkinson's disease.


China tapping AI, big data to get a grip on coronavirus outbreak

The Japan Times

Beijing – A man who had traveled to Wuhan -- the city at the heart of China's coronavirus crisis -- was surprised when police showed up at his door after he returned home, asking to check his temperature. The man, who had quarantined himself at home in Nanjing, Jiangsu province, said he had not told anyone about his recent trip to the city. But by trawling through travel data from Wuhan, local authorities were able to identify him and dispatch officers to his home a week ago, according to a newspaper article posted by the Nanjing government. As Chinese authorities race to contain the spread of a new virus, which has infected more than 34,000 people and killed more than 700 in China, Beijing is turning to a familiar set of tools to find and prevent potential infections: data tracking and artificial intelligence. Several Chinese tech firms have developed apps to help people check if they have taken the same flight or train as confirmed virus patients, scraping data from lists published by state media.