Google's Diversity Stats Are Still Very Dismal

WIRED

The company that championed the idea of moonshots--ambitious ideas that can "make the world a radically better place"--is still struggling to make incremental change when it comes to diversifying its ranks of black, Latinx, and female employees. But as the conversation around diversity in Silicon Valley has evolved and grown more sophisticated, so has Google's approach to the problem. For the first time, Google's annual diversity report, released Thursday, included data on hiring, attrition, and the intersection of race and gender, which exposed telling patterns. In 2017, black employees left Google at the highest rates, followed by Latinx employees; but the attrition numbers also showed that Google was better at retaining female employees than male employees. Google also said it made gains in hiring Asian women.


Google is still very white and very male

Engadget

Google released its annual diversity report today and though strides have been made in some areas, in others, the company has shown little improvement. Globally, Google is 69.1 percent male and in the US 53.1 percent of the workforce is white, 36.3 percent is Asian, 3.6 percent is Latinx, 2.5 percent is black and 0.3 percent is Native American. Compared to last year, the biggest gains were made in the representation of Asian employees, which increased from 34.7 percent. But the percentage of women in Google's workforce as well as the representation of black and Latinx individuals saw hardly any change, increasing just 0.1 percentage point over the year. In regards to hiring, Google did have some successes.


Google releases its first diversity report since anti-diversity memo spread

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google published its fifth annual diversity memo and few are happy with the results. From a broad viewpoint, the search giant's workforce is still predominantly male and white. However, it made incremental improvements in hiring more women in leadership roles, as well as in hiring more females overall. Google published its fifth annual diversity memo and few are happy with the results. Google released its annual diversity report this week.


Google Releases First Annual Diversity Report Since James Damore Incident

International Business Times

Almost a year after former Google employee James Damore's infamous diversity manifesto that put diversity in the tech world under the spotlight once again, Google has released a full diversity report. The exhaustive document provided hard data on how Google's workforce looks on axes of race and gender. The full report can be found here, courtesy of Google. This is the fifth annual report from Google and the first since the Damore incident last August. According to Google's findings, things have not improved much in terms of demographic representation in its employment since last year.


Google's diversity efforts disappoint

FOX News

File photo - A Google carpet is seen at the entrance of the new headquarters of Google France before its official inauguration in Paris, France December 6, 2011. Google needs to do more to boost diversity in its workforce, according to the company's latest annual report on the tech giant's makeup. "The data in this report shows that despite significant effort, and some pockets of success, we need to do more to achieve our desired diversity and inclusion outcomes," explained Danielle Brown, Google's chief diversity and inclusion officer, in a statement on the report. Specifically, the report found that attrition rates for black Google employees, while improving in recent years, have offset some of the company's hiring gains. "We're working hard to better understand what drives higher attrition and taking focused measures to improve it," said Brown.