Hollywood Is Using Artificial Intelligence To Pick Its Next Blockbuster

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Hollywood-based film studios are increasingly using AI as part of the decision-making process when ... [ ] commissioning and producing new films. For anyone who's ever thought Hollywood's output is formulaic and tired, the movie industry may be about to get worse. Major studio Warner Bros. has signed a deal with Cinelytic, which has developed an AI-powered system that can predict the likelihood of a film's success based on such factors as actors, budget and brand. Predictably enough, Warner Bros. will be using Cinelytic's software as part of the research process it undergoes when deciding which movies to commission. While it obviously can't measure how good a film will be artistically, Warner Bros. will likely use it during early production phases to separate ideas likely to succeed from those that most likely aren't.


Hollywood is quietly using AI to help decide which movies to make

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The film world is full of intriguing what-ifs. Will Smith famously turned down the role of Neo in The Matrix. Nicolas Cage was cast as the lead in Tim Burton's Superman Lives, but he only had time to try on the costume before the film was canned. Actors and directors are forever glancing off projects that never get made or that get made by someone else, and fans are left wondering what might have been. For the people who make money from movies, that isn't good enough.


'It's a war between technology and a donkey' – how AI is shaking up Hollywood

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If Sunspring is anything to go by, artificial intelligence in film-making has some way to go. This short film, made as an entry to Sci-Fi London's 48-hour film-making competition in 2016, was written entirely by an AI. The director, Oscar Sharp, fed a few hundred sci-fi screenplays into a long short-term memory recurrent neural network (the type of software behind predictive text in a smartphone), then told it to write its own. The result was almost, but not quite, incoherent nonsense, riddled with cryptic nonsequiturs, bizarre turns of phrase and unfathomable stage directions such as "he is standing in the stars and sitting on the floor". All of which Sharp and his actors filmed with sincere commitment.


Do We Want Artificial Intelligence Running Hollywood?

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When you go to the movies, how do you decide what you want to see? Maybe you're more likely to purchase a ticket if a movie is part of an established franchise in which you are already invested. Maybe a beloved actor or the buzz of awards-season brings you to the big screen. Or maybe a friend hasn't stopped raving about a recent release and you just have to check it out for yourself. Whichever reason brings you to the movies, the question has now become whether artificial intelligence (AI) can predict what you're most likely to see.


Lights, Camera, Data Science: Predictive Analytics for Film Industry

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The film industry and Data Science… What good these two so much unlike fields can bring for each other? If you are tired enough of cleaning data or developing predictive models, welcome to watching some films -- and voila -- you have a new portion of energy and motivation for your data science work. So, yes, the film industry is good for data science. What about the opposite contribution, I mean Data Science for movies? While there are lots of discussions and developments on how Data Science is good for finance, marketing, and other fields, the film industry leaves gaps and it seems like less amount of predictive analytics in it.