Prince: 'If I knew the things I know now before, I wouldn't be in the music industry'

Los Angeles Times

Editor's note: Prince, one of the bestselling pop artists of all time, died April 21, 2016, in his recording studio in Chanhassen, Minn.. In the past, the few reporters who have gained access to Prince Rogers Nelson had to submit to measures more befitting the secrecy of a covert military operation. He insisted that interviewers not use tape recorders or take notes. Lots of topics were declared off limits, and the location of the encounter was always subject to a last-minute change. Now, though, the elusive star has at least relaxed the rules enough to allow a little scribbling.


From the archives: Major work begins on Expo Line in 2007

Los Angeles Times

Standing amid mounds of dirt at the edge of USC on Friday, political leaders celebrated a milestone for L.A.'s fledgling rail system: the start of major construction for a rail line from downtown to the Westside. But like so many mass transit projects in Los Angeles County, the Expo Line was shaped by three decades of political squabbling and compromises that raise questions about whether it can achieve the goal of getting Westsiders out of their cars and onto mass transit. The first 8.6-mile leg of the line will run from the 7th Street/Metro Center station in the heart of downtown to Culver City. But it will be nowhere near many of the Westside's most congested destinations, including the Miracle Mile, Grove-Beverly Center areas, Beverly Hills, West Hollywood, Century City and Westwood/UCLA. Instead, it will move along an old Southern Pacific rail line through relatively quieter southwest L.A., roughly following Exposition Boulevard.


Why the Hammer Museum's new free digital archives are a game changer

Los Angeles Times

Museum archives are historically places that draw only the most dedicated researchers to poke through boxes of files, trays of objects and piles of ephemera generated by exhibitions. But the Hammer Museum is aiming to change the way museum archives are accessed and organized. The Hammer, with the aid of a 500,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is in the process of producing a series of digital archives that will allow researchers and the general public to access information related to some of its exhibitions for free online. The first of these, tied to the museum's 2011 show, "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980," part of the Pacific Standard Time series of exhibitions, debuted online this summer. The project goes beyond just creating a bells-and-whistles exhibition website.


Andrzej Wajda, Oscar-winning Polish film director, dies at 90

Los Angeles Times

Poland's leading filmmaker Andrzej Wajda, whose career maneuvering between a repressive communist government and an audience yearning for freedom won him international recognition and an honorary Oscar, has died. Wajda had recently been hospitalized and died Sunday night, his colleague, film director Jacek Bromski, told the Associated Press. Wajda trod on ground controlled by communist-era censors with "Man of Marble," which looked at the roots of worker discontent in communist Poland in the 1950s, and "Man of Iron" on the rise of the Solidarity movement. In 2000, he was awarded an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement. By that time, four of his films, including "Man of Iron" and Katyn," had been nominated in the foreign film category.


From the Archives: Tom Hayden is serious about running for governor. So why is he having fun?

Los Angeles Times

Editor's note: Tom Hayden, one of the nation's best-known champion of liberal causes, has died in Santa Monica at the age of 76. Hayden served a total of 18 years in the California Assembly and state Senate, mounting a bid for governor in 1994. This article first appeared in the Los Angeles Times on May 22, 1994. This is serious stuff, this business of running for governor. So why is Tom Hayden -- the activist with the angry edge, the man who thwarted the Establishment during the Vietnam War, the non-glamour half of Jane and Tom, the man whose sober warnings of California crises have been uttered regularly for years -- why is he having fun?