Mind-controlled nanobots could release drugs inside your BRAIN

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Tiny mind-controlled nanobots that can be injected into the human body and directed by a doctors' thought could be used to treat diseases in the future. Scientists have for the first time used thought alone to control nanorobots inside a living creature after getting them to release a drug inside cockroaches. They say the technology could be used to treat brain disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and attention deficit disorder. Scientists have created tiny nanobots out of DNA that can carry drugs inside them. These can be controlled using computer software that detects changes in brain activity.


Stephen Hawking Bridged Science and Popular Culture

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The University of Cambridge professor was an iconic figure in both the scientific community and in popular culture, known for his keen mind and humor, as well as his striking physical challenges. Dr. Hawking had long battled with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which left him wheelchair-bound for most of his life. Commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease or motor neuron disease, the condition damages the nerves that control movement and results in paralysis. Patients with ALS typically die within five years of diagnosis. Dr. Hawking, who was diagnosed in 1963 at the age of 21, is believed to have been the longest-living survivor, a fact that still perplexes neurologists.


Stephen Hawking - Wikipedia

@machinelearnbot

Stephen William Hawking CH CBE FRS FRSA (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018)[14][15] was an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge.[16][17] His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.[18][19] Hawking was an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009 and achieved commercial success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book, A Brief History of Time, appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. Hawking had a rare early-onset slow-progressing form of motor neurone disease (also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Lou Gehrig's disease), that gradually paralysed him over the decades.[20][21] Even after the loss of his speech, he was still able to communicate through a speech-generating device, initially through use of a hand-held switch, and eventually by using a single cheek muscle. Hawking was born on 8 January 1942[22] in Oxford to Frank (1905–1986) and Isobel Hawking (née Walker; 1915–2013).[23][24] Despite their families' financial constraints, both parents attended the University of Oxford, where Frank read medicine and Isobel read Philosophy, Politics and Economics.[24] The two met shortly after the beginning of the Second World War at a medical research institute where Isobel was working as a secretary and Frank was working as a medical researcher.[24][26] They lived in Highgate; but, as London was being bombed in those years, Isobel went to Oxford to give birth in greater safety.[27] Hawking had two younger sisters, Philippa and Mary, and an adopted brother, Edward.[28] In 1950, when Hawking's father became head of the division of parasitology at the National Institute for Medical Research, Hawking and his family moved to St Albans, Hertfordshire.[29][30]


Good bot, bad bot: Can you trust a robot that cares?

#artificialintelligence

Less Hal and more Her, responding warmly to the feelings of others may no longer be a uniquely animal quality. Empathetic responses are being integrated into artificial intelligence and robotics, raising sticky ethical questions. The shift can be subtle or overt -- from emotionally appropriate gestures from your smartphone's voice assistant, to comforting robotics in clinical situations. For instance, Danielle Krettek, the founder of Google's Empathy Lab, said her work has contributed to some of the Google Assistant's apparent ability to attune to your mood. "When you say, 'I'm feeling depressed', instead of giving you a description of what depression is, it [might say], 'you know what, a lot of people feel that.


Taiwan Startups Win Singularity University's First APAC Global Impact Challenge - Fintech Hong Kong

#artificialintelligence

Singularity University just concluded their very first APAC Global Impact Challenge (GIC), and two Taiwanese startups have emerged as winners. The challenge aimed to discover moonshot innovations and startups that positively impact the lives of people living in the Asia Pacific, specifically with an ability to scale and impact a billion of people in a decade. Participants were tasked with developing Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications to address global issues posing a threat to sustainability. AI solutions could tackle issues ranging from energy, environment, food, water, disaster resilience, governance, and health, among other things. One of its Taiwanese winners is a startup named Vibrasee, which uses deep learning to determine the early onset of Parkinson's disease.