AI and the retail store of the future

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When it comes to artificial intelligence (AI), both reporters and consumers tend to focus on big, bold, and very sexy stories, like autonomous self-driving cars or machines beating human world champions at games like chess, Go, and even Jeopardy. And I'll admit, those stories are very cool, and they certainly deserve the attention they get. Aside from those stories, though, some of the largest, most practical advancements in AI are happening in the industrial sector, and it might come to the surprise of more than a few that the retail industry -- traditionally risk-averse and more fast follower than early adopter -- is leading the way. Currently, retail sees AI solutions like Amazon's Echo, Google's Home, and Apple's Siri making real differences in the online shopping experience, and the Amazon Go concept store appears destined to be a disruptive force in the brick-and-mortar realm. Seemingly every week, new applications come online, like Original Stitch's Bodygram, which custom-tailors button-down shirts from a single photo.


Alibaba founder Jack Ma: AI will cause people 'more pain than happiness'

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Artificial intelligence and other technologies will cause people "more pain than happiness" over the next three decades, according to Jack Ma, the billionaire chairman and founder of Alibaba. "Social conflicts in the next three decades will have an impact on all sorts of industries and walks of life," said Ma, speaking at an entrepreneurship conference in China about the job disruptions that would be created by automation and the internet. A key social conflict will be the rise of artificial intelligence and longer life expectancy, which will lead to an aging workforce fighting for fewer jobs. Ma, who is usually more optimistic in his presentations, issued the warning to encourage businesses to adapt or face problems in the future. He said that 15 years ago he gave hundreds of speeches warning about the impact of e-commerce on traditional retailers and few people listened because he wasn't as well-known as he is now.


Alibaba billionaire says AI will cause people 'more pain than happiness'

The Guardian

Artificial intelligence and other technologies will cause people "more pain than happiness" over the next three decades, according to Jack Ma, the billionaire chairman and founder of Alibaba. "Social conflicts in the next three decades will have an impact on all sorts of industries and walks of life," said Ma, speaking at an entrepreneurship conference in China about the job disruptions that would be created by automation and the internet. A key social conflict will be the rise of artificial intelligence and longer life expectancy, which will lead to an aging workforce fighting for fewer jobs. Ma, who is usually more optimistic in his presentations, issued the warning to encourage businesses to adapt or face problems in the future. He said that 15 years ago he gave hundreds of speeches warning about the impact of e-commerce on traditional retailers and few people listened because he wasn't as well-known as he is now.


Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning Could Threaten Apps

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The key takeaways from the AI Frontiers Conference, held on January 11–12, include "the central role that AI/ML [Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning] capabilities are playing within Internet/technology companies, emergence of voice/virtual assistants" and the significant capabilities of Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL), Amazon.com, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN) and Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB) in these domains, Baird's Colin Sebastian said in a report. The AI Frontiers Conference focused on applications of deep learning, analyst Sebastian mentioned. Presentations by Alphabet highlighted how Google was using neural networks to "innovate and improve products, including Search, Ads, Photos, Translate, Gmail, Maps, Cloud, voice recognition, self-driving cars and robotics, among others." The teams or projects using deep learning have increased to 4,000, from 200 in early 2014, Sebastian noted.


The best Black Friday 2018 smart home deals from Hue, Amazon Echo, Ring, and more

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. However, our picks and opinions are independent from USA Today's newsroom and any business incentives. Smart home devices can cost a pretty penny, but they can also be surprisingly affordable if you know what to look for, and how to spot a good deal. Lucky for you, Black Friday sales are here, and we've been combing through them all to find the very best deals. We test smart home products non-stop, all year long, so we know which are worth your time, and which you should pass up.