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Personalized Education in the AI Era: What to Expect Next?

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The objective of personalized learning is to design an effective knowledge acquisition track that matches the learner's strengths and bypasses her weaknesses to ultimately meet her desired goal. This concept emerged several years ago and is being adopted by a rapidly-growing number of educational institutions around the globe. In recent years, the boost of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), together with the advances in big data analysis, has unfolded novel perspectives to enhance personalized education in numerous dimensions. By taking advantage of AI/ML methods, the educational platform precisely acquires the student's characteristics. This is done, in part, by observing the past experiences as well as analyzing the available big data through exploring the learners' features and similarities. It can, for example, recommend the most appropriate content among numerous accessible ones, advise a well-designed long-term curriculum, connect appropriate learners by suggestion, accurate performance evaluation, and the like. Still, several aspects of AI-based personalized education remain unexplored. These include, among others, compensating for the adverse effects of the absence of peers, creating and maintaining motivations for learning, increasing diversity, removing the biases induced by the data and algorithms, and the like. In this paper, while providing a brief review of state-of-the-art research, we investigate the challenges of AI/ML-based personalized education and discuss potential solutions.


The Future of Jobs and Jobs Training

#artificialintelligence

Machines are eating humans' jobs talents. And it's not just about jobs that are repetitive and low-skill. Automation, robotics, algorithms and artificial intelligence (AI) in recent times have shown they can do equal or sometimes even better work than humans who are dermatologists, insurance claims adjusters, lawyers, seismic testers in oil fields, sports journalists and financial reporters, crew members on guided-missile destroyers, hiring managers, psychological testers, retail salespeople, and border patrol agents. Moreover, there is growing anxiety that technology developments on the near horizon will crush the jobs of the millions who drive cars and trucks, analyze medical tests and data, perform middle management chores, dispense medicine, trade stocks and evaluate markets, fight on battlefields, perform government functions, and even replace those who program software – that is, the creators of algorithms. People will create the jobs of the future, not simply train for them, ...


Thousands of community college students withdraw after a lost semester amid coronavirus

Los Angeles Times

Stevie Carpenter dropped out of high school, earned his GED, enrolled at L.A. City College and at age 25 has been accepted to attend UC Davis this fall, where he plans to study neurobiology. But the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown another major challenge at him: online classes. Carpenter couldn't keep up with general chemistry, a requirement for his major. It's difficult to just read a book and go off the examples," he said. Instead, he received an "excused" withdrawal, jeopardizing his admission to UC Davis and threatening his plans to become the first in his family of 10 children to attend a four-year university.


Straight From Business School: Data Analytics

#artificialintelligence

Our MBA Classes are taught by students and graduates of top-20 MBA programs with decades of business experience and are designed for entrepreneurs, high school graduates, and employees of Fortune 500 companies and nonprofit organizations around the world. Our classes give you the feel of attending an elite business school right from your home or office, without the cost or admissions requirements of traditional universities. It's never been easier to learn something new. We are creating and consuming more data than ever before and we have the ability to sift through piles of information stored on our servers, databases, computers, tablets, smartphones, and beyond. This data can be used in powerful ways to make strategic decisions that enhance our bottom line and mission.


Fast. Isolating. Superficial.

Slate

Across the country over the past decade, millions of students like Amelia have been retaking classes online as their school districts have tried to boost high school graduation rates and keep struggling students on track. Some researchers and teachers argue the trend fundamentally undermines the integrity of a high school diploma while supporters, including scores of school administrators and politicians, counter that online learning better equips students for an increasingly virtual world and gives more students the opportunity to graduate. Yet apart from a few limited, highly abstract research studies, virtually nothing is known about the student experience in these controversial classes, which have been proliferating rapidly. Since the fall, the Teacher Project has interviewed dozens of students, almost all of whom echoed Amelia's points: They enjoy learning on their own schedules and find the online classes to be fun and flexible in a way that traditional classes often are not. But the students also find the experience to be isolating, the content shockingly superficial, and the online curricula incredibly easy to game through quick Google searches--or even, in several cases, by paying friends to do all the work.