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Image Recognition: A peek into the future

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Our brains are wired in a way that they can differentiate between objects, both living and non-living by simply looking at them. In fact, the recognition of objects and a situation through visualization is the fastest way to gather, as well as to relate information. This becomes a pretty big deal for computers where a vast amount of data has to be stuffed into it, before the computer can perform an operation on its own. Ironically, with each passing day, it is becoming essential for machines to identify objects through facial recognition, so that humans can take the next big step towards a more scientifically advanced social mechanism. So, what progress have we really made in that respect?


Explainable-AI (Artificial Intelligence) Image Recognition Startup Pilots Smart Appliance with Bosch

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Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC), an AI (Artificial Intelligence) software startup, is developing its Smart Home product line through a paid-pilot for smart appliances for BSH Home Appliances, the largest manufacturer of home appliances in Europe and one of the largest in the world. BSH Home Appliances Corporation is a subsidiary of the Bosch Group, originally a joint venture between Robert Bosch GmbH and Siemens AG. ZAC Smart Home product line uses ZAC Explainable-AI Image Recognition. ZAC is the first to apply Explainable-AI in Machine Learning. "You cannot do this with other techniques, such as Deep Convolutional Neural Networks," said Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC.


U.S. Air Force invests in Explainable-AI for unmanned aircraft

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Software star-up, Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC), has received funding from the U.S. Air Force to incorporate the company's 3D image recognition technology into unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and drones for aerial image and object recognition. ZAC's in-house image recognition software is based on Explainable-AI (XAI), where computer-generated image results can be understood by human experts. ZAC – based in Potomac, Maryland – is the first to demonstrate XAI, where various attributes and details of 3D objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," says Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," adds Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


Top 7 Baselines For State-of-the-art Image Recognition Models

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Image classification tasks occupy the majority of machine learning experiments. Their critical usage in medical diagnosis, digital photography, self-driving cars and many others have attracted researchers to innovate models that would give near perfect prediction of the target object. Here, we have compiled a list of top-performing methods according to papers with code, on the widely popular datasets that are used for benchmarking the image classification models. ImageNet consists of more than 14 million images comprising classes such as animals, flowers, everyday objects, people and many more. Training a model on ImageNet gives it an ability to match the human-level vision, given the diversity of data.


Facebook is using your Instagram photos to train its image recognition AI – TechCrunch

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In the race to continue building more sophisticated AI deep learning models, Facebook has a secret weapon: billions of images on Instagram. In research the company is presenting today at F8, Facebook details how it took what amounted to billions of public Instagram photos that had been annotated by users with hashtags and used that data to train their own image recognition models. They relied on hundreds of GPUs running around the clock to parse the data, but were ultimately left with deep learning models that beat industry benchmarks, the best of which achieved 85.4 percent accuracy on ImageNet. If you've ever put a few hashtags onto an Instagram photo, you'll know doing so isn't exactly a research-grade process. There is generally some sort of method to why users tag an image with a specific hashtag; the challenge for Facebook was sorting what was relevant across billions of images.