New AI technology for advanced heart attack prediction

#artificialintelligence

Technology developed using artificial intelligence (AI) could identify people at high risk of a fatal heart attack at least 5 years before it strikes, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF). The findings are being presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in Paris and published in the European Heart Journal. Researchers at the University of Oxford have developed a new biomarker, or'fingerprint', called the fat radiomic profile (FRP), using machine learning. The fingerprint detects biological red flags in the perivascular space lining blood vessels which supply blood to the heart. It identifies inflammation, scarring and changes to these blood vessels, which are all pointers to a future heart attack.


AI tool has potential to predict future heart attacks

#artificialintelligence

In research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), the team developed the biomarker, or'fingerprint' – called the fat radiomic profile (FRP), using machine learning. The FRP reveals biological red flags in the perivascular space lining blood vessels which supply blood to the heart. Furthermore, the tool identifies inflammation, scarring, and changes to these blood vessels, which all indicate the chances of a heart attack in the future. Very often when an individual goes to the hospital with chest pain, a standard component of care is to have a coronary CT angiogram (CCTA). This is a scan of the coronary arteries to check for any narrowed or blocked segments.


New Biomarker 'Fingerprint' with AI Technology Can Now Predict Future Heart Attacks

#artificialintelligence

Technology and AI are increasingly being used to improve our lives, especially in the medical field. Now, researchers at the University of Oxford have used machine learning to help estimate the health of arteries and have developed a new biomarker to predict heart disease, and prevent future heart attacks. The researchers claim it can identify people at risk five years before it strikes. The typical procedure for those with chest pain is to conduct CCTA or coronary CT angiogram -- an imaging test to check the arteries. "If there is no significant narrowing of the artery, which accounts for about 75 per cent of scans, people are sent home, yet some of them will still have a heart attack at some point in the future," the press release claims.


AI technology to predict deadly heart attacks

#artificialintelligence

Scientists at the University of Oxford used AI to develop a new biomarker, or'fingerprint' called fat radiomic profile (FRP). The technology could identify people at high risk of a fatal heart attack at least five years before it strikes by detecting biological red flags in the perivascular space lining blood vessels which supply blood to the heart, Tech Explorist reports. Currently, there are no methods routinely by specialists that can spot the majority of the fundamental warnings for a future heart attack. For this study, scientists primarily used fat biopsies from 167 people undergoing cardiac surgery. They then analyzed the expression of genes related with inflammation, scarring, and new blood vessel formation, and matched these to the CCTA scan images to figure out which highlights best demonstrate changes to the fat encompassing the heart vessels, called perivascular fat.


Artificial intelligence 'predicts fatal heart attacks up to 5 years in advance'

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence could be used to predict those at risk of a fatal heart attack up to five years in advance, new research has found. Experts at the University of Oxford have developed a "fingerprint", or biomarker, using machine learning. When a patient is admitted to hospital with chest pain, it's standard procedure for a coronary CT angiogram (CCTA) to be performed. If no narrowing of the arteries is detected – about 75% of cases – then the patient is sent home – yet some of them suffer a heart attack in the future. There's currently no method routinely used by doctors to spot all underlying red flags of a future heart attack.