Mossberg: The Disappearing Computer

#artificialintelligence

Welcome to Mossberg, a weekly commentary and reviews column on The Verge and Recode by veteran tech journalist Walt Mossberg, executive editor at The Verge and editor at large of Recode. This is my last weekly column for The Verge and Recode -- the last weekly column I plan to write anywhere. I've been doing these almost every week since 1991, starting at The Wall Street Journal, and during that time, I've been fortunate enough to get to know the makers of the tech revolution, and to ruminate -- and sometimes to fulminate -- about their creations. Now, as I prepare to retire at the end of that very long and world-changing stretch, it seems appropriate to ponder the sweep of consumer technology in that period, and what we can expect next. Let me start by revising the oft-quoted first line of my first Personal Technology column in the Journal on October 17, 1991: "Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it's not your fault."


Mossberg: The Disappearing Computer

#artificialintelligence

This is my last weekly column for The Verge and Recode -- the last weekly column I plan to write anywhere. I've been doing these almost every week since 1991, starting at The Wall Street Journal, and during that time, I've been fortunate enough to get to know the makers of the tech revolution, and to ruminate -- and sometimes to fulminate -- about their creations. Now, as I prepare to retire at the end of that very long and world-changing stretch, it seems appropriate to ponder the sweep of consumer technology in that period, and what we can expect next. Let me start by revising the oft-quoted first line of my first Personal Technology column in the Journal on October 17th, 1991: "Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it's not your fault." It was true then, and for many, many years thereafter.


Why Siri Needs to Get Smarter Faster

#artificialintelligence

Apple is the most successful company in the world. But future success for Apple depends to a surprising degree on artificial intelligence. When you think of Silicon Valley's AI leaders, Apple may not immediately come to mind. But the company's initiatives around AI are "amazing." At least that's what the company's newest senior employee said.


Google doubles down on AI

#artificialintelligence

Welcome to Mossberg, a weekly commentary and reviews column on The Verge and Recode by veteran tech journalist Walt Mossberg, now an Executive Editor at The Verge and Editor at Large of Recode. Google announced something for everyone yesterday at its 10th annual I/O developer conference. There were more details of a new version of Android; new messaging and video-calling apps; a built-in new VR platform for Android; and a good-looking Amazon Echo-like smart speaker called Google Home. There was even a cool new research project called Instant Apps that will let users run portions of apps from the web without installing them first. But the biggest theme stressed by Google CEO Sundar Pichai and his lieutenants, over and over again throughout the two-hour keynote, was that Google is doubling down on artificial intelligence as the next great phase of computing.


Apple Strategy Teardown: Where the World's Most Valuable Company Is Focusing In Augmented Reality, Wearables, AI, Cars, And More

#artificialintelligence

The maverick of personal computing is looking for its next big thing in spaces like healthcare, AR, and autonomous cars, all while keeping its lead in consumer hardware. With an uphill battle in AI, slowing growth in smartphones, and its fingers in so many pies, can Apple reinvent itself for a third time? Get the detailed analysis on Apple's trove of patents, acquisitions, earnings calls, recent product releases, and organizational structure. In many ways, Apple remains a company made in the image of Steve Jobs: iconoclastic and fiercely product focused. But today, Apple is at a crossroads. Under CEO Tim Cook, Apple's ability to seize on emerging technology raises many new questions. Looking for the next wave, Apple is clearly expanding into augmented reality and wearables with the Apple Watch and AirPods wireless headphones. Apple's HomePod speaker system is poised to expand Siri's footprint into the home and serve as a competitor to Amazon's blockbuster Echo device and accompanying virtual assistant Alexa. But the next "big one" -- a success and growth driver on the scale of the iPhone -- has not yet been determined. Will it be augmented reality, auto, wearables? Apple is famously secretive, and a cloud of hearsay and gossip surrounds the company's every move. Apple is believed to be working on augmented reality headsets, connected car software, transformative healthcare devices and apps, as well as smart home tech, and new machine learning applications. We dug through Apple's trove of patents, acquisitions, earnings calls, recent product releases, and organizational structure for concrete hints at how the company will approach its next self-reinvention. Given Apple's size and prominence, we won't be covering every aspect of its business or rehashing old news. There's strong evidence Apple is once again actively "cannibalizing itself," putting massive resources behind consumer tech that will render its own iPhone obsolete.