Mossberg: The Disappearing Computer

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Welcome to Mossberg, a weekly commentary and reviews column on The Verge and Recode by veteran tech journalist Walt Mossberg, executive editor at The Verge and editor at large of Recode. This is my last weekly column for The Verge and Recode -- the last weekly column I plan to write anywhere. I've been doing these almost every week since 1991, starting at The Wall Street Journal, and during that time, I've been fortunate enough to get to know the makers of the tech revolution, and to ruminate -- and sometimes to fulminate -- about their creations. Now, as I prepare to retire at the end of that very long and world-changing stretch, it seems appropriate to ponder the sweep of consumer technology in that period, and what we can expect next. Let me start by revising the oft-quoted first line of my first Personal Technology column in the Journal on October 17, 1991: "Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it's not your fault."


Mossberg: The Disappearing Computer

#artificialintelligence

This is my last weekly column for The Verge and Recode -- the last weekly column I plan to write anywhere. I've been doing these almost every week since 1991, starting at The Wall Street Journal, and during that time, I've been fortunate enough to get to know the makers of the tech revolution, and to ruminate -- and sometimes to fulminate -- about their creations. Now, as I prepare to retire at the end of that very long and world-changing stretch, it seems appropriate to ponder the sweep of consumer technology in that period, and what we can expect next. Let me start by revising the oft-quoted first line of my first Personal Technology column in the Journal on October 17th, 1991: "Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it's not your fault." It was true then, and for many, many years thereafter.


Why Siri Needs to Get Smarter Faster

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Apple is the most successful company in the world. But future success for Apple depends to a surprising degree on artificial intelligence. When you think of Silicon Valley's AI leaders, Apple may not immediately come to mind. But the company's initiatives around AI are "amazing." At least that's what the company's newest senior employee said.


Technology takes a back seat to politics, media, and commerce at CodeCon

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Andy Rubin, founder and CEO of Playground Global, a hardware incubator located behind Fry's Electronics in Palo Alto, Calif., showed off a neat Android phone built by his new company, Essential. Also, Bryan Johnson gave a Spotlight talk in which he tried to convince those of us in the audience to let his company, Kernel, put a chip in our brains. But there were no other new product announcements or in-depth discussions of enabling technologies in the pipeline.


Google doubles down on AI

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Welcome to Mossberg, a weekly commentary and reviews column on The Verge and Recode by veteran tech journalist Walt Mossberg, now an Executive Editor at The Verge and Editor at Large of Recode. Google announced something for everyone yesterday at its 10th annual I/O developer conference. There were more details of a new version of Android; new messaging and video-calling apps; a built-in new VR platform for Android; and a good-looking Amazon Echo-like smart speaker called Google Home. There was even a cool new research project called Instant Apps that will let users run portions of apps from the web without installing them first. But the biggest theme stressed by Google CEO Sundar Pichai and his lieutenants, over and over again throughout the two-hour keynote, was that Google is doubling down on artificial intelligence as the next great phase of computing.