Bipartisan law would force Internet giants including Google and Facebook to reveal search algorithms

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google, Facebook and other internet giants would disclose the algorithms they use to return search results under new legislation proposed by US law makers. The bipartisan Filter Bubble Transparency Act also would require the online companies to offer users an unfiltered search option that delivers results without any algorithmic tinkering. Senator John Thune, a Republican from North Dakota, filed the bill on Friday. The legislation was co-sponsored by Republican senators Jerry Moran of Kansas and Marsha blackburn of Tennessee, as well as Democrats Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Mark Warner of Virginia. Senator John Thune, a Republican from North Dakota, filed the bipartisan'Filter Bubble Transparency Act,' which would require internet companies to reveal algorithms used to determine online searches The online firm, owned by Alphabet, like other internet companies relies on algorithms - a highly-specific set of instructions to computers - that track users' behavior and location Thune says the legislation is needed because'people are increasingly impatient with the lack of transparency,' on the internet, reports the Wall Street Journal.


'Hey': short messages are the best dating site strategy, study says

New Scientist

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man on a dating app will pursue a date with a single word: "hey." And according to a new study, that may be the best strategy for attracting a partner who is out of your league. Elizabeth Bruch and Mark Newman at the University of Michigan, US, studied the messaging patterns of 94,478 men and 92,457 women on a free online dating website. The users were located in New York, Boston, Chicago and Seattle, all were seeking heterosexual relationships, and their genders were self-identified. They found that women receive more messages than men, and most of the messages sent on the service go to only a small fraction of users.


Sprint's 5G wireless launch, planned for May, could be the country's first

Washington Post - Technology News

Sprint customers in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and Kansas City will be among the first to test the company's 5G wireless network when it launches in May, executives said Monday. Expect an additional five markets -- Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix and Washington, D.C. -- to come online by the first half of the year, said Sprint chief executive Michel Combes. The impending launch could make Sprint the first U.S. wireless carrier to offer a mass-market 5G service for smartphones in a global race to provide faster download speeds and support for new applications such as self-driving cars. Customers of Google Fi, the wireless service run by Google on Sprint's network, will be able to connect to Sprint's 5G capabilities, as well, Combes said -- though it is unclear when Google Fi customers will gain access to 5G smartphones that can take advantage of the new technology. Company officials declined to say how Sprint's 5G plans will be sold to consumers, or at what price.


You're probably trying to swipe way out of your league on dating apps

Mashable

Online dating isn't easy, and now we have the data to prove it. A new study, published in the journal Science Advances Wednesday -- which analyzed data from a pool of tens of thousands of online dating profiles in New York, Boston, Seattle, and Chicago -- found that people consistently message potential mates who are out of their league. Study authors Elizabeth Bruch and Mark Newman pulled information from profiles and plugged it into an algorithm which took into account age, education, gender, and race/ethnicity in relation to the number of messages received among heterosexual individuals. From there, the scientists sorted out exactly what kind of person received the most messages and from whom during January 2014, the busiest month for online dating sites. Because of this plethora of data from tens of thousands of profiles, the researchers were able to figure out what kind of person received the most message.


Fried chicken for romance?

FOX News

If you're already nervous about a second date before the first one has even started, don't worry -- the dating app Hinge has some tips, based on data, that may help you score round two. The millennial-friendly app recently surveyed more than 8,000 users in New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, Boston, and Washington, D.C., to find out how daters can impress their romantic interests date and land a second meeting First things first, when it comes to choosing your date spot, 37 percent of respondents said that suggesting going out for drinks was your best bet for making a good first impression and getting you a second date. The second best suggestion was coffee at 34 percent, lunch at 30 percent and dinner at 27 percent. If you've made it to that first date and you happen to be going out for drinks, half of the respondents said that suggesting a Bloody Mary as a drink was most likely to get you a second date. The second best drink recommendation was an Old Fashioned at 35 percent, followed by beer at 27 percent, wine at 23 percent, and tequila at 20 percent.