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Introducing a Graph-based Semantic Layer in Enterprises

@machinelearnbot

Things, not Strings Entity-centric views on enterprise information and all kinds of data sources provide means to get a more meaningful picture about all sorts of business objects. This method of information processing is as relevant to customers, citizens, or patients as it is to knowledge workers like lawyers, doctors, or researchers. People actually do not search for documents, but rather for facts and other chunks of information to bundle them up to provide answers to concrete questions. Strings, or names for things are not the same as the things they refer to. Still, those two aspects of an entity get mixed up regularly to nurture the Babylonian language confusion.


A Standard to build Knowledge Graphs: 12 Facts about SKOS

@machinelearnbot

These days, many organisations have begun to develop their own knowledge graphs. One reason might be to build a solid basis for various machine learning and cognitive computing efforts. For many of those, it remains still unclear where to start. SKOS offers a simple way to start and opens many doors to extend a knowledge graph over time. The usage of open standards for data and knowledge models eliminates proprietary vendor lock-in.


A Standard to build Knowledge Graphs: 12 Facts about SKOS

@machinelearnbot

These days, many organisations have begun to develop their own knowledge graphs. One reason might be to build a solid basis for various machine learning and cognitive computing efforts. For many of those, it remains still unclear where to start. SKOS offers a simple way to start and opens many doors to extend a knowledge graph over time. The usage of open standards for data and knowledge models eliminates proprietary vendor lock-in.


The Many Shades of Knowledge Graphs: Let Me Count the Ways

#artificialintelligence

One of the most significant developments about the current resurgence of statistical Artificial Intelligence is the emphasis it places on knowledge graphs. These repositories have paralleled the contemporary pervasiveness of machine learning for numerous reasons, from their aptitude for preparing training datasets for this technology to pairing it with AI's knowledge base for consummate AI. Consequently, graph technologies are becoming fairly ubiquitous in a broadening array of solutions from Business Intelligence mechanisms to Digital Asset Management platforms. With tools like GraphQL gaining credence across the data landscape as well, it's not surprising many consider knowledge graphs one of the core technologies shaping modern AI deployments. As such, it's imperative to understand that all graphs are not equal; there are different types and functions ascribed to the various graphs vying for one another for the knowledge graph title.


The Semantic Zoo - Smart Data Hubs, Knowledge Graphs and Data Catalogs

#artificialintelligence

Sometimes, you can enter into a technology too early. The groundwork for semantics was laid down in the late 1990s and early 2000s, with Tim Berners-Lee's stellar Semantic Web article, debuting in Scientific American in 2004, seen by many as the movement's birth. Yet many early participants in the field of semantics discovered a harsh reality: computer systems were too slow to handle the intense indexing requirements the technology needed, the original specifications and APIs failed to handle important edge cases, and, perhaps most importantly, the number of real world use cases where semantics made sense were simply not at a large enough scope; they could easily be met by existing approaches and technology. Semantics faded around 2008, echoing the pattern of the Artificial Intelligence Winter of the 1970s. JSON was all the rage, then mobile apps, big data came on the scene even as Javascript underwent a radical transformation, and all of a sudden everyone wanted to be a data scientist (until they discovered the fact that data science was mostly math).