UNSW makes atoms in silicon 'talk' in new quantum achievement

ZDNet

A scanning tunnelling microscope image showing the electron wave function of a qubit made from a phosphorus atom precisely positioned in silicon. Scientists from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced making two atom quantum bits (qubits) "talk" to each other in silicon, providing the ability to see their exact position in the solid state. The team, led by Director of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) -- and recent recipient of the Australian of the Year award -- UNSW Professor Michelle Simmons, created the atom qubits by precisely positioning and encapsulating individual phosphorus atoms within a silicon chip. The information is stored on the quantum spin of a single phosphorus electron, the university said. "In placing our phosphorus atoms in the silicon to make a qubit, we have demonstrated that we can use a scanning probe to directly measure the atom's wave function, which tells us its exact physical location in the chip.


UNSW has found a way to access information stored within atoms

ZDNet

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) has announced the demonstration of a compact sensor for accessing information stored in the electrons of individual atoms, touted as a breakthrough that brings a scalable quantum computer in silicon one step closer. UNSW is banking on silicon being the key to building the first quantum computer and the results of the research, conducted within the Professor Michelle Simmons-led Simmons group at the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T), show how this may be achieved. Quantum bits (qubits) made from electrons hosted on single atoms in semiconductors is a promising platform for large-scale quantum computers, the university believes, and creating qubits by precisely positioning and encapsulating individual phosphorus atoms within a silicon chip is the approach Simmons' teams are taking. Read also: Australia's ambitious plan to win the quantum race However, adding in all the connections and gates required for scale up of the phosphorus atom architecture was the challenge the researchers were faced with. "To monitor even one qubit, you have to build multiple connections and gates around individual atoms, where there is not a lot of room," Simmons said.


Flip-flop qubits: UNSW conceives 'radical' quantum computing design

ZDNet

Engineers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have announced the invention of a "radical" architecture for quantum computing, essentially allowing quantum bits (qubits) -- the basic unit of information in a quantum computer -- to be placed hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled. The invention is based on novel "flip-flop qubits" that UNSW said promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper and easier. To operate the flip-flop qubit, researchers need to pull the electron away from the nucleus, using the electrodes at the top; doing so creates an electric dipole. The conceptual breakthrough is the creation of an entirely new type of qubit using both the nucleus and the electron. The new chip design allows for a silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches.


7 Core Qubit Technologies for Quantum Computing - Amit Ray

#artificialintelligence

Here we discussed the advantages and limitations of seven key qubit technologies for designing efficient quantum computing systems. The seven qubit types are: Superconducting qubits, Quantum dots qubits, Trapped Ion Qubits, Photonic qubits, Defect-based qubits, Topological Qubits, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) . They are the seven pathways for designing effective quantum computing systems. Each one of them have their own limitations and advantages. We have also discussed the hierarchies of qubit types.


This qubit redesign may make it easier to make quantum computers

New Scientist

The race to create superfast computers is accelerating. A rethink of one of the most fundamental parts of a quantum computer could pave the way for ultra-powerful devices. Andrea Morello at the University of New South Wales in Australia and his colleagues have a design for a qubit – the smallest unit of quantum information – that could help get round some of the difficulties of manufacturing quantum computers at an atomic scale. At the moment, making quantum systems using silicon is difficult because the qubits have to be very close to each other, about 10 to 20 nanometres apart, in order to communicate. This leaves little room to place the electronics needed to make a quantum computer work.