Department of Information and Communication Engineering University of Tokyo, Japan hy@logos.ic.i.u-tokyo.ac.jp

AAAI Conferences

Monte Carlo Go is a promising method to improve the performance of computer Go programs. This approach determines the next move to play based on many Monte Carlo samples. This paper examines the relative advantages of additional samples and enhancements for Monte Carlo Go. By parallelizing Monte Carlo Go, we could increase sample sizes by two orders of magnitude. Experimental results obtained in 9 9 Go show strong evidence that there are tradeoffs among these advantages and performance, indicating a way for Monte Carlo Go to go.


AI to help, not confront humans, says AlphaGo developer Aja Huang

#artificialintelligence

AI (artificial intelligence) will not confront human beings but serve as tools at their disopal, as human brain will remain the most powerful, although some say AI machines may be able to talk with people and judge their emotions in 2045 at the earliest, according to Aja Huang, one of the key developers behind AlphaGo, an AI program developed by Google's DeepMind unit. Huang made the comments when delivering a speech at the 2017 Taiwan AI Conference hosted recently by the Institute of Information Science under Academia Sinica and Taiwan Data Science Foundation. Huang recalled that he was invited to join London-based Deep Mind Technologies in late 2012, two years after he won the gold medal at the 15th Computer Olympiad in Kanazawa in 2010. In February 2014, DeepMind was acquired by Google, allowing the AI team to enjoy sufficient advanced hardware resources such as power TPU (tensor processing unit) and enabling them to work out the world's most powerful AI program AlphaGo, which has stunned the world by beating global top Go players. In March, 2016, AlphaGo beat Lee Sedol, a South Korean professional Go player in a five-game match, marking the first time a computer Go program has beaten a 9-dan professional without handicaps.


High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – At this year's Tokyo Game Show, the big draw was next-generation 5G networking -- setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery -- particularly lower latency, more vivid images -- and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game Tekken at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.


High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – Next-generation 5G networking was the big draw at Tokyo Game Show 2019, setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery with lower latency, more vivid images and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game "Tekken" at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth at the four-day game show in Chiba. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.


Here's When We Might See a 'The Legend of Zelda' Smartphone Game

TIME - Tech

We could see Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda on smartphones and tablets as early as next year, the Wall Street Journal reports, referring to the Kyoto company's pledge to release a few mobile games based on its bestselling franchises per annual fiscal cycles. The report, if correct -- it's sourced vaguely to "people familiar with the matter" -- would be no great surprise. The Legend of Zelda is a cornerstone Nintendo property, far more recognizable to general audiences than something like Fire Emblem, a turn-based strategy roleplaying series that Nintendo brought to smartphones in early February. Or Animal Crossing, its next smartphone game, delayed but currently due by the end of March 2018. That's to say nothing of the whirlwind success of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a novel take on the fantasy adventure series that at last check has sold nearly 4 million copies between the Wii U and Switch.