UPMC and IBM to Apply Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning to Transform Health Care Supply Chain

#artificialintelligence

In an effort to apply data-driven insights to one of the most fundamental aspects of running a health care system, UPMC announced today that it has formed Pensiamo, an independent company that aims to help hospitals improve supply chain performance through a comprehensive source-to-pay offering, including cognitive analytics with IBM Watson Health technologies. IBM (NYSE:IBM) is a minority owner of Pensiamo. Supply chain costs are the second-largest and fastest-growing expense behind labor costs for health care providers [1]. The Institute of Medicine estimates that nearly one-third of health care spending is waste [2]. In today's dynamic environment, providers face mounting pressure to improve the effectiveness of patient care while controlling costs.


Client Insight - The i-team

#artificialintelligence

Pioneering GCs are taking control of legal spend, armed with the latest tech. Can the rest of the in-house community keep pace? If conventional law firms have been slow to embrace technology – and they have – their counterparts in-house have been barely moving. But in the last five years signs have emerged of'early adopters' in the bluechip general counsel (GC) community who are willing to do more than apply new tools at the margins. The GCs are turning to technology to reshape the way they work. Aside from the obvious efficiency benefits, the appeal to such GC pioneers is often more potent to the professional soul: control. As Reckitt Benckiser's vice president and GC Claire Debney comments: 'I want the intellectual capital in-house, in my team. I don't want to be outsourcing all of our supply agreements, distribution agreements, or our digital platform agreements.


Are tech companies responsible for negative outcomes?

#artificialintelligence

America's largest tech companies face a growing backlash over the potentially negative impacts of their strategic decisions and innovations. For example, companies like Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft are investing in artificial intelligence (AI) technologies and product roadmaps that will replace millions of jobs during the coming years. Experts in marketing, technology and social awareness say it's time for technology providers to assume greater responsibility for the personal pain that comes along with the collective gain. Emerging technology is at almost perpetual odds with the status quo, but U.S. society is coming to realize that dynamic can lead to job losses, unfair treatment of social services and a stain on civic engagement. The power and influence that some tech companies command is being reevaluated in light of the myriad ways people are being disenfranchised in some way by their actions.


Tech predictions for 2017

#artificialintelligence

The annual exercise of looking forward to all the exciting innovations the next year can reasonably be expected to bring is here once again. Last year at Telegraph tech we predicted 2016 would witness the rise of mobile payments, the creation of smart cities that can think and function autonomously, and the premiere of virtual reality in people's living rooms. Trials have proven artificial intelligence to be effective in suggesting treatments by analysing patients' genomes This year we've expanded our horizons somewhat to include moonshot projects, the social ramifications of technology and one disaster scenario. Here are our predictions of the technology events to come in 2017. Self-driving vehicles have arrived more swiftly than anybody thought: Google and Apple have been experimenting with the technology for years, the Autopilot mode on Tesla cars has clocked up over 200 million miles, and every carmaker is scrambling to get self-driving software into their vehicles.


Coming to a doctor's office near you: Live-streaming your exam with Google Glass

#artificialintelligence

Jim Andrews is in a medical office wearing just a hospital gown, staring at his doctor of 11 years, who is staring back at him through the sleek, metallic lens of Google Glass. As the doctor examines Andrews, a new kind of medical scribe is watching the examination, transcribing everything he sees. The scribe, named Rahul, is thousands of miles away in India, and he is viewing the office visit live through the pint-size, WiFi-connected camera attached to the doctor's glasses. "When was his last physical?" Rahul's nearly immediate answer pops up in a text bubble display in the right corner of the doctor's field of vision.