U.S. Air Force invests in Explainable-AI for unmanned aircraft

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Software star-up, Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC), has received funding from the U.S. Air Force to incorporate the company's 3D image recognition technology into unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and drones for aerial image and object recognition. ZAC's in-house image recognition software is based on Explainable-AI (XAI), where computer-generated image results can be understood by human experts. ZAC – based in Potomac, Maryland – is the first to demonstrate XAI, where various attributes and details of 3D objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," says Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as deep Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," adds Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


US Air Force funds Explainable-AI for UAV tech

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Z Advanced Computing, Inc. (ZAC) of Potomac, MD announced on August 27 that it is funded by the US Air Force, to use ZAC's detailed 3D image recognition technology, based on Explainable-AI, for drones (unmanned aerial vehicle or UAV) for aerial image/object recognition. ZAC is the first to demonstrate Explainable-AI, where various attributes and details of 3D (three dimensional) objects can be recognized from any view or angle. "With our superior approach, complex 3D objects can be recognized from any direction, using only a small number of training samples," said Dr. Saied Tadayon, CTO of ZAC. "For complex tasks, such as drone vision, you need ZAC's superior technology to handle detailed 3D image recognition." "You cannot do this with the other techniques, such as Deep Convolutional Neural Networks, even with an extremely large number of training samples. That's basically hitting the limits of the CNNs," continued Dr. Bijan Tadayon, CEO of ZAC.


Following Drones Controversy, Google Publishes Ethical AI Principles

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MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA – Following significant internal backlash at Google against the firm's participation in a U.S. military drone surveillance program, CEO Sundar Pichai has published a list of seven key ethical principles to guide the company's use of AI. Back in April, over 3,000 Google employees – including senior figures – signed an open letter in protest of the search giant's participation in the Pentagon-run Project Maven. Project Maven saw Google machine vision technology being leveraged to'improve' the targeting of U.S. drone strikes, in what the open letter referred to as a'biased and weaponized' use of AI. "This plan will irreparably damage Google's brand and its ability to compete for talent," the letter said. "Google is already struggling to keep the public's trust. Less than two months later, Google CEO Sundar Pichai has responded publicly by setting out core ethical principles for the company's applications of AI and machine learning going forward.


Why good AI should be able to show its work

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What's happening: Explainable AI, also sometimes called transparent AI, has become a top priority for nearly all the big companies in the AI field, including Microsoft, Google, Intel, IBM and Oracle. The topic is also expected to come up in Thursday's White House meeting on AI. That sounds straightforward, even obvious. But it actually isn't a feature built into many of the deep learning systems that are currently available. No one size fits all: AI was a huge topic at Google's I/O developer conference this week, with some focus on explainability as well.


Facial recognition is here to stay. And we should all probably accept it

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For the past few years, the world's biggest tech companies have been on a mission to put artificial-intelligence tools in the hands of every coder. The benefits are clear: Coders familiar with free AI frameworks from Google, Amazon, Microsoft, or Facebook might be more inclined to someday work for one of those talent-starved companies. Even if they don't, selling pre-built AI tools to other companies has become big business for Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. Today these same companies are under fire from their employees over who this technology is being sold to, namely branches of the US government like the Department of Defense and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Workers from Google, Microsoft, and now Amazon have signed petitions and quit in protest of the government work.