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Artificial Intelligence's Impact On Jobs Is Nuanced

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Well, is artificial intelligence a job-killer or not? We keep hearing both sides, from projections of doom for many professions that will necessitate things such as universal basic income to help sidelined workers, to projections of countless unfilled jobs needed to build and manage AI-powered enterprises. For a worker losing his or her job to automation, knowing that an AI programming job is being created elsewhere is of little solace. Perhaps the reality will be somewhere in between. An MIT report released at the end of last year states recent fears about AI leading to mass unemployment are unlikely to be realized. "Instead, we believe that--like all previous labor-saving technologies--AI will enable new industries to emerge, creating more new jobs than are lost to the technology," the report's authors, led by Thomas Malone, director of the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence, conclude.


The intersection of behavioral economics and machine learning to understand Big Data

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I am often asked which jobs will thrive as we move into the next phase of the robot revolution. My answer is that people will need to be multi-skilled. They will need critical thinking and design skills, they will need to be able to think statistically, and they will need a deep knowledge of human behavior.


Computing and artificial intelligence: Humanistic perspectives from MIT

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The MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing (SCC) will reorient the Institute to bring the power of computing and artificial intelligence to all fields at MIT, and to allow the future of computing and AI to be shaped by all MIT disciplines. To support ongoing planning for the new college, Dean Melissa Nobles invited faculty from all 14 of MIT's humanistic disciplines in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences to respond to two questions: As Nobles says in her foreword to the series, "Together, the following responses to these two questions offer something of a guidebook to the myriad, productive ways that technical, humanistic, and scientific fields can join forces at MIT, and elsewhere, to further human and planetary well-being." The following excerpts highlight faculty responses, with links to full commentaries. The excerpts are sequenced by fields in the following order: the humanities, arts, and social sciences. "The advent of artificial intelligence presents our species with an historic opportunity -- disguised as an existential challenge: Can we stay human in the age of AI? In fact, can we grow in humanity, can we shape a more humane, more just, and sustainable world? With a sense of promise and urgency, we are embarked at MIT on an accelerated effort to more fully integrate the technical and humanistic forms of discovery in our curriculum and research, and in our habits of mind and action."


Computing and artificial intelligence: Humanistic perspectives from MIT

#artificialintelligence

The MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing (SCC) will reorient the Institute to bring the power of computing and artificial intelligence to all fields at MIT, and to allow the future of computing and AI to be shaped by all MIT disciplines. To support ongoing planning for the new college, Dean Melissa Nobles invited faculty from all 14 of MIT's humanistic disciplines in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences to respond to two questions: As Nobles says in her foreword to the series, "Together, the following responses to these two questions offer something of a guidebook to the myriad, productive ways that technical, humanistic, and scientific fields can join forces at MIT, and elsewhere, to further human and planetary well-being." The following excerpts highlight faculty responses, with links to full commentaries. The excerpts are sequenced by fields in the following order: the humanities, arts, and social sciences. "The advent of artificial intelligence presents our species with an historic opportunity -- disguised as an existential challenge: Can we stay human in the age of AI? In fact, can we grow in humanity, can we shape a more humane, more just, and sustainable world? With a sense of promise and urgency, we are embarked at MIT on an accelerated effort to more fully integrate the technical and humanistic forms of discovery in our curriculum and research, and in our habits of mind and action."


Computing and artificial intelligence: Humanistic perspectives from MIT

#artificialintelligence

The MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing (SCC) will reorient the Institute to bring the power of computing and artificial intelligence to all fields at MIT, and to allow the future of computing and AI to be shaped by all MIT disciplines. To support ongoing planning for the new college, Dean Melissa Nobles invited faculty from all 14 of MIT's humanistic disciplines in the School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences to respond to two questions: As Nobles says in her foreword to the series, "Together, the following responses to these two questions offer something of a guidebook to the myriad, productive ways that technical, humanistic, and scientific fields can join forces at MIT, and elsewhere, to further human and planetary well-being." The following excerpts highlight faculty responses, with links to full commentaries. The excerpts are sequenced by fields in the following order: the humanities, arts, and social sciences. "The advent of artificial intelligence presents our species with an historic opportunity -- disguised as an existential challenge: Can we stay human in the age of AI? In fact, can we grow in humanity, can we shape a more humane, more just, and sustainable world? With a sense of promise and urgency, we are embarked at MIT on an accelerated effort to more fully integrate the technical and humanistic forms of discovery in our curriculum and research, and in our habits of mind and action."