Rembrandt's secret technique REVEALED

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Rembrandt is one of the most famed artists of all time and scientists have finally discovered the secret ingredient to his iconic technique. The Dutch genius refined his impasto technique, which gave a 3D appearance to his work, with a mystery recipe for his paint. Centuries of research found it to be a combination of materials traditionally available on the 17th century Dutch colour market, namely lead white pigment, cerussite and organic mediums such as linseed oil. Until now, the exact combination remained a mystery. Scientists have used cutting-edge imaging techniques to find the missing ingredient called plumbonacrite.


Rembrandt's masterpiece 'The Night Watch' will be restored inside glass cabinet at Amsterdam gallery

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Rembrandt's'The Night Watch' will undergo a one year long, multi-million-pound restoration - all carried out in front of visitors to Amsterdam's Rijksmuseum. The unique project, starting in July 2019, will let art lovers see behind the normally secretive process at the famous Dutch museum. The 17th Century masterpiece by the Dutch artist will be encased in a specially made glass chamber, where the restoration will be carried out. Repair in progress: Rembrandt's The Night Watch, one of the world's most famous paintings, is to be restored to its former glory live in front of a museum audience The huge Golden Age masterpiece will first undergo a thorough varnish-to-canvas examination using a precise microscope and other modern techniques, Rijksmusem general director Taco Dibbits said. 'The Night Watch by Rembrandt is one of the most famous paintings in the world and we feel we have to preserve it for future generations,' Rijksmuseum General Director Taco Dibbits told AFP. 'Over two million people a year come to see The Night Watch, it's a painting that everybody loves, and we feel that the world has the right to see what we will do with it.'


Computer paints 'new' Rembrandt' after analysing hundreds of his portraits - and even recreates the brush strokes using a 3D printer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A'new' Rembrandt painting has been revealed - 400 years after the artist's death. Researchers taught an AI to paint exactly like the Dutch painter by analysing 346 of Rembrandt's paintings. The work of art took almost 18 months to complete, consists of 148 billion pixels and was printed in 3D to allow to computer to even replicate the brush strokes. The painting'The Next Rembrandt' is being unveiled at Galerie Looiersgracht60 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 05 April 2016. The painting was created by scientists and technicians based on the historical data of all 346 paintings by Rembrandt.


Rembrandt may have traced his own self-portraits

Daily Mail - Science & tech

He is one of the greatest artists of all time, famed for his detailed portraits that helped cement his reputation as one of the Dutch Old Masters. But when it came to his self portraits, Rembrandt van Rijn appears to have needed a bit of technological help getting his depictions just right. The 17th century artist might have used a combination of mirrors and lenses to project his faceonto a surface, allowing him to trace the outline, according to new research. Rembrandt's self portraits are well-known for being highly detailed, and the Dutch painter often favoured himself as his subject (self portrait pictured). Known for his self-portraits and biblical scenes, his early work was small but rich in detail; religious and allegorical themes were prominent.


New 'Rembrandt' Painting Was Created by Computer

#artificialintelligence

Last week, scholars revealed an as-yet-unknown Rembrandt painting. The picture, which shows a man looking away, had the rich colors, subtle emotion, characteristic brushstrokes, and evocative play of light and shadow so characteristic of the Dutch master's style. But it turns out this mysterious picture wasn't a long-lost Rembrandt canvas uncovered in some forgotten 17th-century warehouse: It was instead made out of whole cloth by a computer algorithm and a 3D printer. The computer algorithm created the "new Rembrandt" after painstakingly studying the painter's entire corpus, then mimicking Rembrandt's painting techniques, styles and subjects. While the artistic merits of the painting are a matter of personal opinion, the process could reveal more insights into the great master's works, said Gary Schwartz, an art historian and author of "Rembrandt's Universe: His Art, His Life, His World" (Thames & Hudson Ltd., 2014).