32 Ways AI is Improving Education Getting Smart

#artificialintelligence

In the last few years, machine learning applications have quietly entered every aspect of life: social media to speech recognition, radiology to retail, warfare to writing articles, coding to customer service, robotics to route optimization. During the 40 year information age, we told computers what to do. With advances in artificial intelligence, particularly machine learning, and faster processing chips we can feed computers giant data sets and they can (in narrow slivers) draw some inferences on their own. As we reported in Ask About AI, the rise of code that learns marks the beginning of a new era of augmented intelligence. It's a great opportunity for us to expand access to a great education and for young people to make a big contribution.


Do L.A. Unified's daily random searches keep students safe, or do they go too far?

Los Angeles Times

L.A. Unified requires daily random searches for weapons using metal-detector wands at all of its middle and high school campuses, including Hamilton High. L.A. Unified requires daily random searches for weapons using metal-detector wands at all of its middle and high school campuses, including Hamilton High. Kevin Castillo was in his freshman year at Hamilton High School when administrators carrying hand-held metal detectors interrupted his English class to conduct a random search. They asked a student to pick a number between 1 and 10. The student chose 7, so every seventh person in the class had to gather up belongings and step out of the classroom.


Class Act: Irving sixth grader designs robot that could aid school safety

#artificialintelligence

You're never too young to start making a huge impact. That's what makes Jaime Cuevas our Class Act of the Week. Jaime is just in the sixth grade at Lamar Middle School, but he's already inventing some big things!


Victim in Texas High School Shooting 'In Good Spirits'

U.S. News

Officials say a 15-year-old girl who was shot at a Texas high school is "in good spirits," but they won't say what prompted her classmate to open fire in a school cafeteria with dozens of other students nearby.


After Making Shooting Threat, Judge Bans Teen From Playing Violent Video Games

International Business Times

A Chicago high school student allegedly made a threat and received an unusual punishment for it, the Chicago Tribune reported. The 16-year-old posted a video on Snapchat that eventually led to a felony charge and his banishment from the world of violent video games.