Artificial muscles that mimic human muscles could let machines move like humans

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Robots have become one step closer to being more human-like. Researchers have developed actuators that generate movements similar to those of a bicep muscle and are also shock absorbent. This innovated technology uses vacuum power to automate soft, rubber beams, which could one-day allow robots and humans to safely work alongside each other. Researchers have developed actuators for cyborgs that generates movements similar to those of skeletal muscles and are even shock absorbing. Similar to human muscles, actuators are soft, shock absorbing and are not harmful to the robots environment or the humans in it.


Artificial muscles from KAIST are small enough to power robotic butterflies

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, or KAIST, have developed an ultra-thin actuator for soft robotics. The artificial muscles, recently reported in the journal Science Robotics, were demonstrated with a robotic blooming flower brooch, dancing robotic butterflies, and fluttering tree leaves on a kinetic art piece. Actuators are the robotic equivalents of muscles, expanding, contracting, or rotating like muscle fibers in response to a stimulus such as electricity. Engineers around the world are striving to develop more dynamic actuators that respond quickly, can bend without breaking, and are very durable. Soft robotic muscles could have a wide variety of applications, from wearable electronics to advanced prosthetics.


RoboBee powered by soft muscles

Robohub

The sight of a RoboBee careening towards a wall or crashing into a glass box may have once triggered panic in the researchers in the Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), but no more. Researchers at SEAS and Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have developed a resilient RoboBee powered by soft artificial muscles that can crash into walls, fall onto the floor, and collide with other RoboBees without being damaged. It is the first microrobot powered by soft actuators to achieve controlled flight. "There has been a big push in the field of microrobotics to make mobile robots out of soft actuators because they are so resilient," said Yufeng Chen, Ph.D., a former graduate student and postdoctoral fellow at SEAS and first author of the paper. "However, many people in the field have been skeptical that they could be used for flying robots because the power density of those actuators simply hasn't been high enough and they are notoriously difficult to control. Our actuator has high enough power density and controllability to achieve hovering flight."


RoboBee powered by soft artificial muscles can crash into walls without being damaged

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A group of scientists have created a resilient RoboBee, that can survive crashing into walls and other robots without being damaged. The invention marks the first microrobot powered by soft artificial muscles that has achieved a controlled flight. Researchers in the Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) developed a resilient artificial bee powered by soft actuators. Often these soft components have been dismissed as too difficult to control as their flexibility can lead to the system buckling at weak points if pushed to activate movements at speed. Yufeng Chen, a former graduate student and postdoctoral fellow at SEAS and first author of the paper, said: 'There has been a big push in the field of microrobotics to make mobile robots out of soft actuators because they are so resilient.'


Prepare to Be Hypnotized By These Delicate Paper Robots

WIRED

As far as plant names go, the sleepy plant--or shy plant, or shameplant, known more formally as Mimosa pudica--is hard to beat. Touch one of its leaves and it curls up like it's embarrassed, the leaflets folding in on each other. Now, the shameplant is getting its very own robotic doppelganger. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed deceptively simple actuators (the fancy term for a motor that moves a robot) made of conductive 3-D printed material and paper. It's not the burliest actuator by any means, but paper actuators could well carve out their own niche in robotics.