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The Heirloom Art of the Sewing Machine

The Atlantic - Technology

Both of my sewing machines come from my grandmothers, though neither taught me how to sew. The older one is a child-sized, antique Singer, which can no longer stitch a seam. The hand crank that powers it, however, still turns, and the presser foot still lifts. The other--a plastic electric model from the 1970s--runs well, for now. It'll eventually go the way of my mother's machine, a workhorse that outlived the manufacture of replacement parts.


This $25 handheld sewing machine is great for quick fixes, easy stitches

Mashable

How much clothing have you tossed out, shoved in the back of a drawer, or forgot about simply because of a small rip, broken hem, or torn pocket? But pulling out your grandmother's bulky old sewing machine that you barely know how to use isn't exactly convenient. While it looks sort of like a stapler and has a silly-sounding name, the Handy Dandy Portable Sewing Machine really is handy and dandy. It's designed to reach many of the places you can't and do the quick repairs you normally would let fall by the wayside. It runs on AA batteries and is easy to operate, even for the non-sewer, is quiet, suitable for all fabrics, and doesn't require any time-consuming needle-threading.


Fix it yourself with a Brother FS40 40-stitch electronic sewing machine for under £130

Mashable

When you think of sewing and sewing machines, you may think about one of your grandparents, stitching up your favourite pair of jeans, or modifying a dress that would never otherwise have fit. Sewing is having somewhat of a resurgence though, alongside other pursuits that promote a certain kind of mindfulness. Sewing is much like colouring or gardening, in that you have to take a breath, and shut out the world for a period, and that's an amazing thing to do. Sewing is all about switching off, and dialling in to your project, whatever that may be. Whether you are dress-making, home-furnishing, or repairing a favourite item, the Brother FS40 40-stitch electronic sewing machine is the perfect device to help you along the way.


The best intermediate sewing machine

Engadget

This post was done in partnership with The Sweethome, a buyer's guide to the best homewares. When readers choose to buy The Sweethome's independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. After talking with two sewing machine dealers, a teacher, and seasoned sewers, we think computerized machines are the best bet for intermediate sewers and for beginners who know they love sewing and can invest a little more for features that will make learning easier. We spent 12 hours researching specs, reviews, and recommendations, and testing several machines. We think the Janome DC5100 offers the best combination of useful and versatile computerized features for a range of sewers.


This Singer sewing machine is $70 off

Mashable

SAVE $70: As of Dec. 27, the Singer Sylist Computerized Sewing Machine is only $229.99 -- that's $70 off its usual price. The easy setup, massive stitch selection, and accessory collection make this a great choice for beginners to expand their creative possibilities. The humble sewing machine exploded in popularity during 2020 from a mix of necessity (sewing face masks) and boredom (being stuck at home). If you missed out on the trend or just finally found a reason to take on a new creative endeavor, you don't need to empty your savings. There are plenty of deals waiting for you.