WA Auditor General recommends inter-agency cooperation to counter malware

ZDNet

Western Australia's Office of the Auditor General (OAG) has made six recommendations to state government agencies after it was found six agencies had previously been the target of malware campaigns. According to the OAG, the six agencies probed -- which included the Department of the Attorney General, Department of Mines and Petroleum, Department of Transport, Main Roads Western Australia, and the Office of the Government Chief Information Officer (OGCIO) -- were under constant threat, which it said highlighted the need for improved central governance arrangements to identify, warn of, and prevent attacks. In its report [PDF], Malware in the WA State Government, the OAG said as a result of the audit, it made "detailed recommendations" to each agency that came under the microscope. The explicit details were not published, but instead, the OAG offered up the broader six recommendations it made, which included an in-depth assessment of the risk to the agency malware poses, improving any controls the OAG identified as ineffective, and that each agency consider additional controls to better secure its networks, systems, and data against malware. TPG to focus on FttB, mobile, corporate business to manage NBN margin squeeze Productivity Commission draft report calls time on USO as NBN looms Risk vs. Opportunity: Data use and availability in Australia NSW government seeks partner to trial Uber-like public transport Optus inks AU$40m contract extension with security firm Suretek Under the careful watch of the OGCIO, the Auditor General said it wants to see the WA public sector consider methods to foster "collaboration, information, and resource sharing" between agencies.


Australia could see driverless cars on the road within five years

Mashable

South Australia may have gotten a head start with trials in 2015, but New South Wales (NSW) is also committing to a driverless car future. Automated cars without drivers could be on NSW roads within five years, the state's minister for transport, Andrew Constance, predicted at a summit on the future of transport in Sydney Monday. "We're going to have driverless cars on our streets, in our suburbs," he told reporters. In his opinion, the South Australian government may have "jumped the gun a little bit" with its initial road tests last year. To support its own rollout of driverless cars, the NSW State Government announced the creation of a Smart Innovation Centre in western Sydney.


Ridesharing legalised in another Australian state, but Uber's not happy

Mashable

Slowly but surely, Australia is becoming a rideshare-friendly nation, but not every state is doing it Uber's way. On Tuesday, the South Australian government announced that from July 1, it would become the latest region to legalise services such as UberX that let people drive their own cars to take customers from A to B. It follows the legalisation of ridesharing in 2015 by the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) and New South Wales (NSW) governments. Like NSW, the government will be offering an assistance package to ease the transition for taxi drivers. South Australians will presumably help pay for the scheme, handing over a levy of A 1 per ride in taxis and rideshare services. "Our reforms deliver a genuine level playing field between taxis, chauffeur vehicles and new entrants like Uber," State Premier Jay Weatherill said in the statement.


ICAC finds former Sydney University IT manager acted corruptly

ZDNet

The New South Wales Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) has found that a former head of projects in the IT department at Sydney University engaged in serious corrupt conduct by improperly exercising his functions as an official at the university. ICAC found on Wednesday that Jason Meeth gave preferential treatment to Sydney-based Canberra Solutions Pty Ltd by selecting that company's candidates to work at the university as IT contractors, despite it not being a NSW government-accredited C100 company, which was a requirement under the university's direction for the recruitment of IT contractors. The watchdog said it is satisfied Meeth knew at the time he was required to comply with the now-scrapped "C100 scheme", which was displayed by him arranging for Canberra Solutions contractors to be nominated through an accredited supplier, so it would appear the process was just. ICAC said Meeth went as far as disguising the university's use of Canberra Solutions, which was managed by Balu Moothedath and his wife Sonata Devadas, on official documentation. The commission said this was because Meeth knew what he was undertaking was contrary to university policy.


NSW Department of Justice transforms back end with ServiceNow

ZDNet

The New South Wales Department of Justice (DOJ) has turned to ServiceNow to modernise its IT management systems, with its Digital Technology Services (DTS) team replacing a number of legacy systems that DOJ found itself possessing following a handful of agency mergers. The solution provided by the enterprise cloud company is expected to support 12 agencies with one integrated platform, consolidating IT infrastructure, applications, and information management across the department. The IT service management (ITSM) from ServiceNow will allow DOJ to deliver a single source of information to users managing customer requests and enquiries across Courts and Tribunals; Correctional Services NSW; Office of Emergency Management; Office for Police; Justice Strategy and Policy; Justice Services; Juvenile Justice; Births, Deaths, and Marriages; Crown Solicitors; and Veteran Affairs. Speaking with media at the ServiceNow Now Forum in Sydney on Wednesday, DOJ director of Operations and Services Andrew Dimech said the department has transformed the business processes that cover the 14 agencies DOJ supports and 14,000-something end users into a "one-stop shop" for service delivery. The new business support centre within the DTS now runs HR and finance service management, combining them into one interface that handles all requests and incidents.