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KRACK Wi-Fi attack threatens all networks: How to stay safe and what you need to know

PCWorld

A devastating flaw in Wi-Fi's WPA security protocol makes it possible for attackers to eavesdrop on your data when you connect to Wi-Fi. Dubbed KRACK, the issue affects the Wi-Fi protocol itself--not specific products or implementations--and "works against all modern protected Wi-Fi networks," according to Mathy Vanhoef, the researcher that discovered it. That means that if your device uses Wi-Fi, KRACK likely impacts it. Read on for what you need to know about the KRACK Wi-Fi vulnerability, from how it works to how to best protect yourself against it. KRACK (short for, uh, Key Reinstallation AttaCK) targets the third step in a four-way authentication "handshake" performed when your Wi-Fi client device attempts to connect to a protected Wi-Fi network.


Here is every patch for KRACK Wi-Fi attack available right now

ZDNet

Monday morning was not a great time to be an IT admin, with the public release of a bug that effectively broke WPA2 wireless security. Security experts have said the bug is a total breakdown of the WPA2 security protocol. The security protocol, an upgrade from WEP, is used to protect and secure communications between everything from our routers, mobile devices, and Internet of Things (IoT) devices, but there is an issue in the system's four-way handshake that permits devices with a pre-shared password to join a network. According to security researcher and academic Mathy Vanhoef, who discovered the flaw, threat actors can leverage the vulnerability to decrypt traffic, hijack connections, perform man-in-the-middle attacks, and eavesdrop on communication sent from a WPA2-enabled device. US-CERT has known of the bug for some months and informed vendors ahead of the public disclosure to give them time to prepare patches and prevent the vulnerability from being exploited in the wild -- of which there are no current reports of this bug being harnessed by cyberattackers.


Apple and Google promise updates to fix massive flaw Wi-fi

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google and Apple have promised to update the software that caused severe flaws in Wi-Fi home technology networks, leading to one of the biggest security scares of the year. Computer security experts were on high alert yesterday after it emerged encryption algorithms designed to protect people's privacy online have been cracked. The incident, described as'unprecedented', led technology companies to rapidly issue updates - although it seems many could have known about it for weeks. The incident led technology companies to rapidly issue updates - although it seems many could have known about it for weeks. Microsoft said it had already fixed the problem for users on Windows 7,8 and 10, writes the Telegraph.


Why the Krack Wi-Fi Mess Will Take Decades to Clean Up

WIRED

A vulnerability in Wi-Fi encryption has sent the entire tech industry scrambling; the so-called Krack attack affects nearly every wireless device to some extent, leaving them subject to hijacked internet connections. In terms of scope, it doesn't get much worse--especially for the Internet of Things.


U.S. issues warning, providers scramble, as security flaw seen leaving Wi-Fi connections open to hackers

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – A newly discovered flaw in the widely used Wi-Fi encryption protocol could leave millions of users vulnerable to attacks, prompting warnings Monday from the U.S. government and security researchers worldwide. The U.S. government's Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) issued a security bulletin saying the flaw can open the door to hackers seeking to eavesdrop on or hijack devices using wireless networks. "Exploitation of these vulnerabilities could allow an attacker to take control of an affected system," said CERT, which is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The agency's warning came on the heels of research by computer scientists at the Belgian university KU Leuven, who dubbed the flaw KRACK, for Key Reinstallation Attack. According to the news site Ars Technica, the discovery was a closely guarded secret for weeks to allow Wi-Fi systems to develop security patches.