Facebook Live will change social media – but in what way?

The Guardian

In August 2015, Facebook rolled out a new feature: the ability to broadcast live video streams from the company's app for power users, Facebook Mentions. Six months later, the feature, now branded Facebook Live, began a slow rollout for normal users, initially in the United States. In classic Facebook style, the feature was late arriving, slow to roll out, and steadily demolished the competition. Meerkat, the company which ignited the live streaming craze, launched its mobile app in February 2015 and went meteoric at the South by Southwest Festival in March that year. But its time in the sun was limited: shortly after SXSW ended, Twitter subsidiary Periscope launched its own, technically superior, live-streaming service, eclipsing Meerkat almost instantly.


Facebook begins the global roll-out of Live: Service takes on Periscope and lets users stream video instantly wherever they are

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If sharing views and emoji with friends on Facebook isn't enough, the social network has added the ability for users across the world to stream live videos. As part of the roll-out of Facebook Live, which was previously only available in the US, the company is rearranging the notification panel on its apps to widen the audience watching live video on the site. The shift is part of Facebook's effort to turn its Liive video feature into a marquee attraction as more people use their smartphones to record and share snippets of their lives. If sharing views and emoji with friends on Facebook isn't enough, the social network is adding the ability for users across the world to stream live videos from today. The image on the left shows a notification for a new live video and the one of the right, of a live broadcast showing people's reactions The move follows rumours Google is building a livestreaming app dubbed YouTube Connect that would let users stream and watch live videos from their mobiles.


Facebook bolsters its video streaming tool with new features

Boston Herald

In the two months since Facebook made its video broadcasting tool available to all users, the social network has found people are 10 times more likely to write a comment under a live stream than an ordinary video. That intense engagement is what makes Facebook and marketers salivate, as it could open a new front for a company whose advertising revenue grew nearly 50 percent last year to over 17 billion. The Menlo Park, Calif., tech giant said it won't include ads in its streaming video in the near future. For now, the company is mainly interested in learning how users interact with its new tool and whether a vibrant ecosystem of user-generated videos can drive its growth. On Wednesday, the company introduced a host of new features to Facebook Live, including the ability to live-stream to select groups of friends, live reactions with floating emojis and photo filters.


Facebook Unleashes a Raft of Live-Video Updates

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Facebook Inc. on Wednesday unveiled a raft of updates designed to get more of its billion-plus users to create and watch live video. The company is attacking live video on several fronts, introducing new tools for users while working with media companies and celebrities to generate videos. In some cases Facebook is paying outsiders to post videos on the network. Recode earlier reported Facebook was willing to pay for content. Facebook is using the Groups and Events pieces of its software to get more people to create and share video.


YouTube set to take on Periscope: 'Connect' streaming service will let you watch stars like PiePieDew and Zoella LIVE

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you avidly follow vloggers on YouTube but crave more interaction, you could soon watch them live. Google is reported to be building on a livestreaming app dubbed YouTube Connect that would let users stream and watch live videos from their mobiles. The service would see the video powerhouse going head-to-head with Twitter's Periscope and Facebook Live. Google is said to be building on a livestreaming app dubbed YouTube Connect that would let users stream and watch live videos from their mobiles. The feature was spotted in YouTube's Creator Studio by Venturebeat, but Google declined to comment.