Raytheon's laser and microwave buggy test brought down 45 drones

Engadget

This week, Raytheon announced it successfully tested its anti-drone technology. The advanced high-power microwave and laser dune buggy brought down 45 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and drones at a U.S. Army exercise that was held in Fort Sill, Oklahoma. The microwave system was able to bring down multiple UAVs at once when the devices swarmed, while the high energy laser (HEL) was able to identify and shoot down 12 Class I and II UAVs, as well as six different stationary devices that propelled mortar rounds. The equipment is intended to protect US troops against drones; it's self-contained and easy to deploy in a tense situation. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory worked with Raytheon to develop this counter-drone and UAV tech.


Potential and Peril

Communications of the ACM

The history of battle knows no bounds, with weapons of destruction evolving from prehistoric clubs, axes, and spears to bombs, drones, missiles, landmines, and systems used in biological and nuclear warfare. More recently, lethal autonomous weapon systems (LAWS) powered by artificial intelligence (AI) have begun to surface, raising ethical issues about the use of AI and causing disagreement on whether such weapons should be banned in line with international humanitarian laws under the Geneva Convention. Much of the disagreement around LAWS is based on where the line should be drawn between weapons with limited human control and autonomous weapons, and differences of opinion on whether more or less people will lose their lives as a result of the implementation of LAWS. There are also contrary views on whether autonomous weapons are already in play on the battlefield. Ronald Arkin, Regents' Professor and Director of the Mobile Robot Laboratory in the College of Computing at Georgia Institute of Technology, says limited autonomy is already present in weapon systems such as the U.S. Navy's Phalanx Close-In Weapons System, which is designed to identify and fire at incoming missiles or threatening aircraft, and Israel's Harpy system, a fire-and-forget weapon designed to detect, attack, and destroy radar emitters.


HP Enterprise let Russia review the Pentagon's security software

Engadget

Last year, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) allowed a Russian defense agency to analyze the source code of a cybersecurity software used by the Pentagon, Reuters reports. The software, a product called ArcSight, is an important piece of cyber defense for the Army, Air Force and Navy and works by alerting users to suspicious activity -- such as a high number of failed login attempts -- that might be a sign of an ongoing cyber attack. The review of the software was done by a company called Echelon for Russia's Federal Service for Technical and Export Control as HPE was seeking to sell the software in the country. While such reviews are common for outside companies looking to market these types of products in Russia, this one could have helped Russian officials find weaknesses in the software that could aid in attacks on US military cyber networks. Echelon says it's required to report software vulnerabilities to the Russian government but only after letting the software makers know.


Security News This Week: Julian Assange Has Lost His Internet Privileges

WIRED

After weeks of unrelenting chaos, the cybersecurity world took a little bit of a breather. There was still one of the biggest data breaches in recent memory, compliments of UnderArmour. But hey, everyone makes mistakes, including the world's most elite hackers--just ask the Russian intelligence agent behind the Guccifer 2.0 persona, whose failure to use a VPN just once outed him as GRU. Or ask people who used Monero in the early days and put too much faith in its privacy protections, which a new study says aren't as robust as they seemed, especially before a recent update. Or even ask Facebook, which left a privacy setting active for years that didn't actually do anything.


NHS cyber attack used US government software leaked by WikiLeaks

The Independent - Tech

The ransomware that is wreaking havoc on NHS computers is believed to be using an NSA cyber-weapon leaked in WikiLeaks' Vault 7 release earlier this year. Malware called Wanna Detector is preventing hospital staff from accessing medical records. Hospitals in both England and Scotland are known to be affected. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.