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Former Facebook VR boss wins contract for Pentagon's controversial 'Project Maven' AI program

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Facebook's former virtual reality head is leading a new Silicon Valley startup that has won a contract to support the Pentagon's controversial'Project Maven' program, according to The Intercept. The startup, called Anduril Industries, is led by Palmer Luckey, the 26-year-old founder of Facebook's virtual reality unit Oculus. Project Maven, which seeks to incorporate AI technology on the battlefield, first attracted the attention of Google, but the firm later backed out of its contract after worldwide upheaval from its employees. Palmer Luckey (pictured), Facebook's former virtual reality head, is leading a new Silicon Valley startup that has won a contract to support the Pentagon's Project Maven program Palmer Luckey hit headlines last March after being jettisoned from Oculus, the VR company he helped found and sold to Facebook. In September 2016, it emerged that he secretly funded a pro-Donald Trump group that mocked Hillary Clinton online, during the US presidential race.


Palmer Luckey's company earned a contract for the Pentagon's Project Maven AI program

#artificialintelligence

Palmer Luckey's Anduril Industries has won a contract on the Pentagon's controversial AI program, Project Maven, reports The Intercept. Since founding the company in 2017, Luckey has focused on the defense industry, building advanced systems that could be used for border surveillance. Project Maven is a controversial artificial intelligence program that uses machine learning to sort through millions of hours of drone footage to help systems distinguish people from their surroundings. The project would help reduce the burden on human analysts and improve the intelligence that's captured in cameras. The project's goal is to get better information to military officers, with the idea that with better decisions, there's less of a change of mistakes that result in civilian casualties.


Anduril's New Drone Offers to Inject More AI Into Warfare

WIRED

They spent hours circling the sky, seeking, among other things, surface-to-air missile launchers lurking in the brush. The missiles they found weren't enemy ones. They were props for early test flights of a prototype military drone stuffed with artificial intelligence--the latest product from Anduril, a defense-tech startup founded by Palmer Luckey, the creator of Oculus Rift. The new drone, the Ghost 4, shows the potential for AI in military systems. Luckey says it is the first generation that can perform various reconnaissance missions, including searching an area for enemy hardware or soldiers, under the control of a single person on the ground.


Palmer Luckey chases government contracts with 'virtual wall'

Engadget

When you hear talk of a border wall, you typically picture an actual, physical construction. The Oculus co-founder and his startup Anduril Industries have been working on a virtual wall -- one complete with cameras, sensors and VR -- with the aim of scoring a US defense contract and providing border security at a fraction of the cost of a physical wall. Luckey discussed plans for this technology last year, but now it's being tested, both officially and unofficially, and it's catching the eye of US officials. Wired reports that Anduril has constructed a prototype of its Lattice system on a ranch in Texas and is also conducting a government-funded test of its technology outside of San Diego. "They said they could provide broader border security for a lower cost," Melissa Ho, managing director of Silicon Valley's Department of Homeland Security office, told Wired.


Inside Anduril, Palmer Luckey's Bid to Build A Border Wall

WIRED

The whistle of a stiff and constant wind cuts through a silence that gives no hint of the hostilities, both physical and political, that animate these borderlands. Palmer Luckey--yes, that Palmer Luckey, the 25-year-old entrepreneur who founded the virtual reality company Oculus, sold it to Facebook, and then left Facebook in a haze of political controversy--hands me a Samsung Gear VR headset. Slipping it over my eyes, I am instantly immersed in a digital world that simulates the exact view I had just been enjoying in real life. In the virtual valley below is a glowing green square with text that reads PERSON 98%. Luckey directs me to tilt my head downward, toward the box, and suddenly an image pops up over the VR rendering.