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Linda Brown, at center of key 1954 Kansas school desegregation ruling, dies at 76

The Japan Times

TOPEKA, KANSAS – Linda Brown, the Kansas girl at the center of the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down racial segregation in schools, has died at age 76. Topeka's former Sumner School was all-white when her father, Oliver, tried to enroll the family. He became lead plaintiff in the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision by the Supreme Court that ended school segregation. Peaceful Rest Funeral Chapel of Topeka confirmed that Linda Brown died Sunday afternoon. Her sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, founding president of The Brown Foundation, confirmed the death to The Topeka Capital-Journal.


Court ruling raises possibility Kansas schools can't open

U.S. News

FILE - In this May 10, 2016 file photo, Kansas Supreme Court Justice Marla Luckert, center, asks a question to the state as they make their arguments in front of the Kansas Supreme Court, in Topeka, Kan. The judges are threatening again to close the state's public schools and has rejected some education funding changes enacted by legislators earlier this year. The court ruled Friday, May 27, 2016, on a law that revised parts of the state's funding formula but resulted in no change in total funds for most of the state's 286 school districts (Chris Neal/The Topeka Capital-Journal via AP File) MANDATORY CREDIT The Associated Press


Kansas Congressman Charged With Three Felonies for Voter Registration Listing UPS Store as His Residence

Slate

The party's self-serving obsession with excluding specific Americans from the country's democratic system because someone, somewhere out there might get the bright idea to commit a crime has always been political boogeyman. But every once in a while, with no sense of irony, some power-hungry, rules-averse Republican politician goes and proves them right! This time we have first-term GOP Rep. Steve Watkins of Kansas, who, on Tuesday, was charged with three felonies related to Watkins' pretty iffy looking voter registration on which he stated his home address was a Topeka UPS store. The Watkins campaign said it was a mistake, but the district attorney disagreed, charging the congressman with multiple felonies for voting without being qualified, unlawful advance voting, providing false information, and interference with law enforcement. Watkins' backstory is hazy, which raised a number of eyebrows during his first run for office in 2018 when he won a crowded Republican primary with 26 percent of the vote.


McD's in hot water with police

FOX News

The recent actions of a McDonald's employee in Kansas are leaving a bad taste in the mouths of police officers and their supporters. A Topeka employee at the fast food chain has been fired and is currently facing criminal charges after local law enforcement say the worker put mustard in an officer's beverage. On Friday, an officer with the Topeka Police Dept. says he went through the McDonald's drive-thru at the 2000 block of NW Topeka Blvd. The officer--who has not been named--said his drink tasted funny and lifted the lid to find what appeared to be mustard squired inside, reports 13 NEWS. On Sunday, Kansas Going Blue posted a picture of the tainted drink on its official Facebook page.


Marking Roe anniversary, abortion foes pin hopes on Trump

Associated Press

Roe v. Wade protesters rally on the steps of the Statehouse to mark the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide in Topeka, Kan., Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. Roe v. Wade protesters rally on the steps of the Statehouse to mark the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide in Topeka, Kan., Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. State Representatives and Senators stand with organizers of a protest against Roe v. Wade on the steps of the Statehouse in Topeka, Kan., as hundreds converged on the Kansas Statehouse to mark the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide, Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) -- Abortion opponents expressed optimism Monday that President Donald Trump's early months in office would advance their cause as hundreds converged on the Kansas Statehouse to mark the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.