A solar panel that is 'British weather-proof' has been invented by scientists

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists claim to have developed solar power technology that can produce around 20 per cent more energy in cloudy weather, compared to conventional solar cells. Researchers say their co-called'British weather proof' technology is cheaper, more energy efficient and more flexible than traditional solar panels. It is also able to convert solar energy to electricity in low light conditions, when conventional technology is ineffective. Scientists claim to have developed solar power technology that can produce around 20 per cent more energy in cloudy weather, compared to conventional solar cells. Researchers say their co-called'British weather proof' technology is cheaper and more energy efficient Australian researchers who created the technology believe their work represents a'significant step' towards making the technology commercially viable.


Breakthrough turns windows into solar panels and stores Sun's energy for nearly TWO DECADES

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Scientists say a breakthrough in solar energy could turn the average window into a source of heat and store energy captured by the sun's rays for decades. The method was developed by scientists from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and employs a specially engineered chemical and new type of storage apparatus that they say could render today's lithium ion batteries defunct. According to them, their system starts with a special molecule containing carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen that is tailored to trap the sun's rays upon contact - a new form of chemically-driven solar power that promises to lower environmental footprint. The scientists new solar captures system (pictured in a diagram above) uses novel new methods of storage and chemical engineering to capture the sun's rays and heat homes That molecule can be used to make a type of laminate that they envision being applied to windows, cars, or even clothing. Once the energy is captured, it can be released in the form of heat by introducing to a catalyst, they say.


The world's first all-solar power village comes online in Morocco

Daily Mail - Science & tech

This month, a small Moroccan village earned the distinction of becoming Africa's first fully solar powered village. The project cost just $188,000 to build and generates 8.32 kilowatts of electricity for the village's 20 homes. Surplus energy produced by the panels is stored in a battery system that holds up to five hours of electricity that can be used after the sun sets. As part of the project, every home in the village was given an electric refrigerator, a water heater, television, oven, and electrical outlet to charge phones or other electric devices. Previously, villagers had lived by candle light at night, and used wood from local trees for heating and cooking fuel.


Abu Dhabi turns on the 'world's biggest' single site solar plant with 3.2MILLION panels

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Abu Dhabi has turned on the world's largest single solar plant that will eventually provide green energy for 90,000 people. Once fully operational the Noor Abu Dhabi, which has 3.2million solar panels, will reduce emissions by around one million metric tonnes of CO2 - the equivalent of taking 200,000 cars off the road. The 3.1 square mile (8 square kilometre) project in Sweihan is the biggest single plant in the world. Some solar parks are larger, but are run by multiple businesses who use shared infrastructure and work separately. China currently has the world's largest solar park in Zhongwei, Ningxia, which covers 16.6 square miles (43 square kilometres) of land.


Air Force develops new system to harvest solar energy in space, then beam it down to military bases

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Air Force has announced a radical new plan to deliver power to military bases in remote locations or areas that lack stable power sources. Through a new $100million partnership between with defense contractor Northrop Grumman, the Air Force Research Laboratory will develop a system of satellites with solar panels to harvest solar energy while in orbit around the Earth. The energy gathered by the satellites will then be converted into radio waves and transmitted to the surface of the Earth where they will be converted back into usable energy. 'This technology was first looked at in the 1960s or so, and it wasn't cost-effective then,' the Air Force's Maj. Tim Allen told Stars & Stripes.