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MSCHF's latest drop lets you control a Boston Dynamics robot with a paintball gun on its back

#artificialintelligence

At least one future is here right now. The prankster art / marketing collective MSCHF recently spent $74,500 to purchase a Spot robo-dog from Boston Dynamics. It mounted a Tippmann 98 paintball gun on its back and is allowing people around the world to remotely control the bot via their phones in an art gallery filled with its own work for two minutes at a time. MSCHF is calling it Spot's Rampage, and the event is happening on February 24th at 1PM ET. When killer robots come to America they will be wrapped in fur, carrying a ball.


Bad Spot, bad! Pranksters mounted a paintball GUN on a Boston Dynamics' $75,000 robot dog

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Forget'a bull in a china shop' -- tomorrow, members of the public will be able to take remote control of an armed, paintball-firing robotic dog in an art gallery. Quirky, chaos-loving, New York-based start-up MSCHF (pronounced'mischief') are behind the campaign, which highlights the risk of such machines being misused. MSCHF mounted the compressed air gun onto the back one of Boston Dynamics' $75,000 Spot robots and will be linking its controls to a public website. Spot's'rampage' will begin at 13:00 EST (18:00 GMT) on February 24, 2021 and every two minutes the site will hand over control to a different smartphone user. The event is being held in a small art gallery constructed in MSCHF's Brooklyn offices -- one populated by paintings, vases, boxes and the firm's past products. Boston Dynamics have criticised MSCHF's paintball-firing application of their robot -- calling it the stunt a'spectacle' that'fundamentally misrepresents' Spot.


Game lets you control Boston Dynamics' robot dog and shoot paintballs with it

Mashable

You may have heard of Spot, the robot dog made by robotics company Boston Dynamics. While Spot was designed to help humans, the reality of a metal hound -- that can walk lockstep in an army of their robotic brothers, no less -- is terrifying. Regardless, capitalism has prevailed and last summer, Boston Dynamics made Spot available for sale at the low, low price of $75,000. MSCHF, the group behind viral stunts like Finger On The App and Walt's Kitchen, decided to buy a Spot. Naturally, they attached a paintball gun to their metal pup, plopped him in an art gallery with shootable and climbable objects, and created a game: Spot's Rampage.


NYPD robo-dog 'Digidog' investigates hostage situation in the Bronx

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Residents in the Bronx, New York stopped dead in their tracks as a four-legged robotic dog trotted down East 227th Street Tuesday. The machine, called Digidog, was accompanying human officers responding to a home invasion and barricade situation. Digidog joined the New York Police Department last year, which changed the machine's yellow color to blue and black and gave it a new name - it was initially named'Spot' by its creators Boston Dynamics. The robotic dog, according to reports, was sent inside a building in the Bronx to climb stairs and investigate an area for a hostage situation – but no one was found. The videographer, Daniel Valls of FreedomNews.tv, said the dog responded to a home invasion and barricaded situation on East 227th Street near White Plains Road in Wakefield. Digidog was designed for emergency situations that would otherwise be too dangerous for human officers.


Here's your chance to post to an Instagram account with a million followers

Mashable

Influencers have faced newfound scrutiny in the past year for a variety of tone deaf moves like throwing ragers while their city is locked down or simply trying to sell during a pandemic-fueled economic downturn. Despite the backlash, however, the influencer market is booming. The "influencing" industry is like many others in that a select few reap the rewards. But what if influencing was more democratized? What if anyone could be an influencer, or at least have a million Instagram followers?