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Air travel 'without your passport leaving your pocket'

BBC News

New technologies are helping to tackle one of the great scourges of air travel - airport queues. Queues to check-in and drop your bags, at security, at passport control and finally queues at your boarding gate. Air travel can be a frustrating business, even if these queues are largely a result of airports trying to ensure our safety. And as more of us fly - 4.4 billion passengers are forecast to take to the skies in 2018 - airports are being pushed to their limits. So the industry is hoping technology can streamline the process, with increasing use of biometrics such as facial recognition - and not just at passport control.


The Rise of Smart Airports: A Skift Deep Dive

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In late September, Beijing unveiled to the world Daxing, a glimmering $11 billion airport showcasing technologies such as robots and facial recognition scanners that many other airports worldwide are either adopting or are now considering. Daxing fits the description of what experts hail as a "smart airport." Just as a smart home is where internet-connected devices control functions like security and thermostats, smart airports use cloud-based technologies to simplify and improve services. Of course, many of the nearly 4,000 scheduled service airports across the world are still embarrassingly antiquated. The good news for aviation is that more facilities are investing, finally, to better serve airlines, suppliers, and travelers. This year, airports worldwide will spend $11.8 billion -- 68 percent more than the level three years ago -- on information technology, according to an estimate published this month by SITA (Société Internationale de Telecommunications Aeronautiques, an airline-owned tech provider). A few trends are driving the rise of smart airports. Flight volumes are increasing, so airports need better ways to process flyers. Airports need better ways to make money, too, by encouraging passengers to spend more in their shops and restaurants. Data is growing in importance. Everything happening at an airport, from where passengers are flowing to which items are selling in stores, generates data. Airports can analyze this data to spot opportunities for eking out fatter profits. They can sell the data to third-parties as well.


The Amazing Ways Dubai Airport Uses Artificial Intelligence

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As one of the world's busiest airports, (ranked No. 3 in 2018 according to Airports Council International's world traffic report), Dubai International Airport is also a leader in using artificial intelligence (AI). In fact, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) leads the Arab world with its adoption of artificial intelligence in other sectors and areas of life and has a government that prioritizes artificial intelligence including an AI strategy and Ministry of Artificial Intelligence with a mandate to invest in technologies and AI tools. The Emirates Ministry of the Interior said that by 2020, immigration officers would no longer be needed in the UAE. They will be replaced by artificial intelligence. The plan is to have people just walk through an AI-powered security system to be scanned without taking off shoes or belts or emptying pockets.


The Amazing Ways Dubai Airport Uses Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

As one of the world's busiest airports, (ranked No. 3 in 2018 according to Airports Council International's world traffic report), Dubai International Airport is also a leader in using artificial intelligence (AI). In fact, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) leads the Arab world with its adoption of artificial intelligence in other sectors and areas of life and has a government that prioritizes artificial intelligence including an AI strategy and Ministry of Artificial Intelligence with a mandate to invest in technologies and AI tools. The Emirates Ministry of the Interior said that by 2020, immigration officers would no longer be needed in the UAE. They will be replaced by artificial intelligence. The plan is to have people just walk through an AI-powered security system to be scanned without taking off shoes or belts or emptying pockets.


Hong Kong International Airport: Facing the future of security

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Chris Au Young, General Manager of the Smart Airport initiative at Airport Authority Hong Kong reveals how Hong Kong International Airport has utilised new biometric technology to help the airport achieve a better, faster, more seamless airport experience for passengers. More and more people are flying than ever before. In 2017, more than four billion passengers around the world took to the skies, a figure that is expected to double over the next 20 years. However, a greater number of travellers means more pressure on airports, which must process hundreds of thousands of passengers each day, from check-in to immigration, security to boarding. Airports must be able to cope with rising demands whilst ensuring passenger safety, security and a seamless airport experience.