Goto

Collaborating Authors

Researchers use machine learning to teach robots how to trek through unknown terrains

#artificialintelligence

A team of Australian researchers has designed a reliable strategy for testing physical abilities of humanoid robots--robots that resemble the human body shape in their build and design. Using a blend of machine learning methods and algorithms, the research team succeeded in enabling test robots to effectively react to unknown changes in the simulated environment, improving their odds of functioning in the real world. The findings, which were published in a joint publication of the IEEE and the Chinese Association of Automation Journal of Automatica Sinica in July, have promising implications in the broad use of humanoid robots in fields such as healthcare, education, disaster response and entertainment. "Humanoid robots have the ability to move around in many ways and thereby imitate human motions to complete complex tasks. In order to be able to do that, their stability is essential, especially under dynamic and unpredictable conditions," said corresponding author Dacheng Tao, Professor and ARC Laureate Fellow in the School of Computer Science and the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Sydney.


Welcome to GreenCo Robots --- Food Delivery Robots & UV Disinfection Robots

#artificialintelligence

How to take advantage of robots for your business? Sign up to hear from us about specials, sales, and events for Food Delivery Robots & UV Disinfection Robots. We love our customers, so feel free to visit during normal business hours to take a look at food delivery robots & UV disinfection robots in person. You are welcome to contact us to book a Robot Demo at your location! This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.


Toshiba's new robot can speak in sign language

AITopics Original Links

The "communication android", as Toshiba is calling its creation, was unveiled this week at the Cutting-Edge IT & Electronics Comprehensive Exhibition (CEATEC), Japan, and has been designed for a maximum of movement fluidity in its hands and arms, employing 43 actuators in its joints, in order to speak in Japanese sign language. At this point, its range is fairly limited: it can mimic simple movements, such as greetings, but the company has plans to develop the robot -- named Aiko Chihira -- into a full communications robot by 2020. This will include speech synthesis, speech recognition, robotic control and other sensors. The end goal, the company said, is a robot that can serve as a "companion for the elderly and people with dementia, to offer telecounseling in natural speech, communicate through sign language and allow healthcare workers or family members to keep an eye on elderly people." If the robot looks familiar, that's because it was developed in collaboration with Osaka University, which has been developing humanoid robots for some time.


Robot 101: Learning to work with humans

AITopics Original Links

With the advent of "inherently safe" robots, industrial designers are changing their ideas about the factory of the future. Robots such as ABB's Frida and the Baxter robot from MIT spinoff Rethink Robotics are working "elbow to elbow with people," says Julie Shah, an assistant professor in MIT's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and director of the MIT Interactive Robotics Group. "They're designed so that if they hit a person they don't significantly harm them." Working in the Interactive Robotics Group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Shah is taking the next step: teaching these inherently safe robots how to work together in teams with people, and vice versa. "We're focused on robot learning, planning, and decision making, and how they interact with humans in high intensity and safety critical environments," Shah says.


Tend.ai applies the cloud and machine learning to co-working robots

#artificialintelligence

Co-working robots are the near future of work. As long as we still need humans somewhere on the factory floor, we need robots that can safely operate next to those humans. The most famous example of a co-working robot is Rethink Robotics' Baxter. But, of course, co-working can't be a category of one, and this new Tend.ai Basically, with Tend.ai you buy a regular robot arm, and attach a regular webcam to it, and then you let Tend.ai supply the smarts.