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A trusty robot to carry farms into the future

#artificialintelligence

Farming is a tough business. Global food demand is surging, with as many as 10 billion mouths to feed by 2050. At the same time, environmental challenges and labor limitations have made the future uncertain for agricultural managers. A new company called Future Acres proposed to enable farmers to do more with less through the power of robots. The company, helmed by CEO Suma Reddy, who previously served as COO and co-founder at Farmself and has held multiple roles and lead companies focused on the agtech space, has created an autonomous, electric agricultural robotic harvest companion named Carry to help farmers gather hand-picked crops faster and with less physical demand. Automation has been playing an increasingly large role in agriculture, and agricultural robots are widely expected to play a critical role in food production going forward.


Robot reapers and AI: Just another day on the farm

ZDNet

The agriculture industry has hit a turning point. Faced with a massive labor crunch and environmental instability, aggressive technology deployments are no longer an option for outliers in the sector, but a necessary and critical element in the success of the farm. Enabling the transformation are a host of new developers, but also legacy companies with deep roots in agriculture. Smart technology from companies like John Deere, for example, is helping farmers to produce more with less and create more successful crops, all while having a smaller impact on the land and environment. In contrast to prevailing wisdom that you can't teach an old dog new tricks, John Deere is employing AI and machine learning in its equipment to identify and enable needed actions at a scope and speed beyond human capacity, automating farming actions through smart robotics to enable consistent and precise actions at large scale, and providing precise, geospatial intelligence generated with machine technology and coupled with cloud-stored data to enable sustainable farming.


Top Six Digital Transformation Trends In Agriculture

Forbes - Tech

In recent years, technology in agriculture, also known as AgTech has rapidly changed the industry. In 2015, the industry's investment in technology reached a whopping $4.6 billion--and that was three years ago! However, our population is continuing to grow, which has the potential to affect resource availability going forward. In recent studies, it was found that the industry's output must increase by 60% by 2030. People in the industry--farmers, food producers--must embrace the digital transformation trends in agriculture.


Use of artificial intelligence in agriculture

#artificialintelligence

From cultivation to improving harvesting quality, AI is known as one of the main elements for a surplus yield but that too for the ones who are capable enough to make use of it. Agriculture is seeing rapid adoption of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, both in terms of agricultural products and in field farming techniques. Apart from that, most of the countries are looking forward to involving such techniques. In 2016, the estimated value added by the agricultural industry was estimated at just under 1% of the US GDP. The US Environmental Protection Agency, estimates that agriculture contributes roughly $330 billion in annual revenue to the economy, thus such techniques would definitely speed things up.


The Farms of the Future Will Be Automated From Seed to Harvest

@machinelearnbot

Orbiting satellites snap high-resolution images of the scene far below. In fact, it's science fiction already being engineered into reality. Today, robots empowered with artificial intelligence can zap weeds with preternatural precision, while autonomous tractors move with tireless efficiency across the farmland. Satellites can assess crop health from outer space, providing gobs of data to help produce the sort of business intelligence once accessible only to Fortune 500 companies. "Precision agriculture is on the brink of a new phase of development involving smart machines that can operate by themselves, which will allow production agriculture to become significantly more efficient.