Goto

Collaborating Authors

Google's DeepMind faces suit over UK health data

#artificialintelligence

DeepMind Faces: Google's AI department, otherwise known as DeepMined, the Google-owned AI research company, is the subject of a lawsuit. The lawsuit focuses on the company's use of the personal records of a whopping 1.6 million UK National Service patients, including confidential medical records. The #Google #AI department is getting a class-action lawsuit for gaining 1.6 million confidential medical records of #NHS patients. According to PCGamer, DeepMind received the documents to create a health application the company calls Streams. It was supposed to be an AI-based assistant to help healthcare workers and was previously used by the British National Health Service.


Google AI department sued for using the health data of 1.6 million NHS patients

#artificialintelligence

A class-action lawsuit has been launched against DeepMind, the Google-owned AI research company, over its use of the personal records of 1.6 million patients from the UK's National Health Service (thanks, AI News). The health data was provided by the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust in 2015.DeepMind is known for several achievements, not least kicking everyone's ass at Starcraft 2, but it was given the records in order to create a health app called Streams. This was supposed to be an AI-powered assistant to healthcare professionals and has been used by the UK NHS—but no more. This August it was announced that Streams is being decommissioned, and DeepMind's own 'health' section now returns a server error.The handing-over of patient records to one of the world's biggest technology companies was exposed by New Scientist in 2017, in a report showing that DeepMind had access to far more data than had been publicly announced. The UK Information Commission launched an investigation that ruled the Royal Free hospital hadn't done enough to protect patients' privacy: following which, DeepMind apologised. "Our investigation found a number of shortcomings in the way patient records were shared for this trial," Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said at the time. "Patients would not have reasonably expected their information to have been used in this way."The new suit has been launched by lead plaintiff Andrew Prismall, who was a patient at the Royal Free hospital, and includes approximately 1.6 million other affected patients on an 'opt-out' basis—that is, all parties will be included in the action unless they request otherwise."Given the very positive experience of the NHS that I have always had during my various treatments, I was greatly concerned to find that a tech giant had ended up with my confidential medical records," said Prismall in a statement."As a patient having any sort of medical treatment, the last thing you would expect is your private medical records to be in the hands of one of the world’s biggest technology companies. I hope that this case will help achieve a fair outcome and closure for all of the patients whose confidential records were obtained in this instance without their knowledge or consent."


Google DeepMind NHS data deal was 'legally inappropriate'

New Scientist

Google DeepMind received 1.6 million identifiable personal medical records on an "inappropriate legal basis", according to a letter written by Fiona Caldicott at the UK's National Data Guardian, a government watchdog that monitors patient confidentiality. The letter obtained by Sky News was sent to the medical director of the Royal Free NHS Trust in London on 20 February. The data sharing agreement between the trust and DeepMind was first revealed by a New Scientist investigation last year. Google's AI firm originally obtained the NHS patient records to test a smartphone app called Streams that could help monitor people with kidney disease. A quarter of acute kidney deaths are preventable if caught early, so DeepMind wanted to use its algorithms to try to spot early signs of the disease.


Google artificial intelligence company has access to 1.6m NHS records

#artificialintelligence

Up to 1.6 million patients have had their private medical files passed on to Google without their permission, it was revealed today The internet giant was given the data by one of the largest NHS trusts to develop an app to monitor possible kidney failure. The encrypted information includes the names and medical histories of every patient who had stayed in hospital overnight or attended A&E in the past five years. None of the patients was told beforehand and the revelation has exposed the ease with which private companies can obtain highly sensitive medical information without consent. Privacy campaigners told MailOnline that the revelations exposed the public's lack of power and control over their own personal details. Experts say the deal between Google and the Royal Free NHS Trust could set a precedent for patient data to be routinely passed on to private firms.


Google's AI has access to the private medical records of 1.6m NHS patients

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Up to 1.6 million patients have had their private medical files passed on to Google without their permission, it was revealed today The internet giant was given the data by one of the largest NHS trusts to develop an app to monitor possible kidney failure. The encrypted information includes the names and medical histories of every patient who had stayed in hospital overnight or attended A&E in the past five years. None of the patients was told beforehand and the revelation has exposed the ease with which private companies can obtain highly sensitive medical information without consent. Privacy campaigners told MailOnline that the revelations exposed the public's lack of power and control over their own personal details. Experts say the deal between Google and the Royal Free NHS Trust could set a precedent for patient data to be routinely passed on to private firms.