Trump Campaign Wastes A Lot Of Paper Printing Articles About Trump

Huffington Post - Tech news and opinion

One could argue there's some human bias inherent in any programmed search algorithm -- Google News has to understand how to weigh the Chicago Tribune against an obscure Tumblr, even if some users might prefer reading the latter -- but that's just the nature of the beast. For Trump, who wants to get a broad view of the news media and harass big name reporters, this is probably fine. But his staff is making a curious choice, if Nuzzi's article is correct. Searching for "Donald J. Trump" instead of the more general "Donald Trump" or "Trump" severely limits the number of articles surfaced by Google News. On Monday, "Donald J. Trump" returned 139,000 results on Google News.


The Internet Is No Place for Elections

MIT Technology Review

Despite what your local election officials may tell you, you can't trust the Internet with your vote. This election year we've seen foreign hackers infiltrate the Democratic National Committee's e-mail system as well as voter databases in Arizona and Illinois. These attacks have reinforced what political scientists and technical experts alike have been saying for more than a decade: public elections should stay offline. It's not yet feasible to build a secure and truly democratic Internet-connected voting system. Researchers from government agencies and leading academic institutions studied the issue extensively following the debacle of the 2000 Presidential race, and the consensus emerged that it should not occur.


The Internet Is No Place for Public Elections

MIT Technology Review

Despite what your local election officials may tell you, you can't trust the Internet with your vote. This election year we've seen foreign hackers infiltrate the Democratic National Committee's e-mail system as well as voter databases in Arizona and Illinois. These attacks have reinforced what political scientists and technical experts alike have been saying for more than a decade: public elections should stay offline. It's not yet feasible to build a secure and truly democratic Internet-connected voting system. Researchers from government agencies and leading academic institutions studied the issue extensively following the debacle of the 2000 Presidential race, and the consensus emerged that it should not occur.


U. of C. researchers use data to predict police misconduct

#artificialintelligence

In two Loop office buildings about eight blocks apart, a pair of University of Chicago research teams are analyzing big data to answer a thorny question that has become especially charged in recent months: Will a police officer have an adverse interaction with a citizen? The team from the university's Crime Lab is in the first stages of working with the Chicago Police Department to build a predictive data program to improve the department's Early Intervention System, which is designed to determine if an officer is likely to engage in aggressive, improper conduct with a civilian. The other team, part of U. of C.'s Center for Data Science & Public Policy, is expected to launch a data-driven pilot of an Early Intervention System with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department in North Carolina by the end of the summer. The center is working on similar efforts with the Los Angeles County sheriff's office and the Nashville and Knoxville police departments in Tennessee. Data crunching has been used in policing since the late 1970s.


'You are so out of it,' judge tells lawyer for Gov. Mike Pence in case about Syrian refugee policy

Los Angeles Times

Attorneys defending Indiana Gov. Mike Pence's order to bar agencies from helping Syrian refugees resettle in his state faced unusually fierce questioning before a federal appeals court Wednesday, suggesting the panel might side with a lower court that found the order discriminatory. A three-judge panel for the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago zeroed in on the intelligence and intent behind the Republican vice presidential candidate's order, which a federal judge said in February "clearly discriminates" against refugees from the war-torn nation. Judges suggested that Indiana could've had a stronger argument for opting out of the refugee program -- in which states disperse federal money to resettlement organizations -- instead of excluding Syrians. "If you're in, you play by the government's rules," Judge Frank Easterbrook said. The oral arguments came the same day the White House announced that the refugee program will be expanded in the next year as concern continues about the refugee crisis stemming from Syria's civil war and conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.