Udacity turns 5: Sebastian Thrun talks A.I. and plans for a nanodegree in self-driving cars

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Massive open online courses (MOOCs) -- distance-learning courses open to an unlimited number of people on the web -- are estimated to become an 8.5 billion industry by 2020, up from almost 2 billion last year. Udacity is one of countless companies offering MOOCs and has raised more than 160 million in VC funding to date, including a 105 million round it closed seven months back. Competitors such as Coursera and Udemy have raised more than 300 million between them. There are more than 11,000 people enrolled in Udacity's nanodegree programs today, and in excess of four million people have enrolled in one of Udacity's free courses. Last month, Udacity teamed up with Google yet again to launch an Android Basics Nanodegree aimed at those with little or no programming experience.


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Udacity is partnering with IBM Watson, Didi Chuxing, and Amazon for a new "Nanodegree" program. Artificial intelligence, the machine learning technology that allows "smart" machines to take over human tasks like driving cars or ordering pizza, is quickly becoming the go-to technology for many industries to hire talent for, including health care, auto, and finance. Research firm Markets and Markets estimates the AI market will grow to more than $5 billion by 2020, given the rising adoption of AI across these industries. That's why online education company Udacity is debuting a new way for workers to learn skills needed to be experts in developing artificial intelligence for the likes of IBM and others. Udacity originally launched "Nanodegrees" to train people hoping to land technical jobs, such as software developing.


This Online Education Firm Is Offering an Artificial Intelligence Training Program

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Artificial intelligence, the machine learning technology that allows "smart" machines to take over human tasks like driving cars or ordering pizza, is quickly becoming the go-to technology for many industries to hire talent for, including health care, auto, and finance. Research firm Markets and Markets estimates the AI market will grow to more than $5 billion by 2020, given the rising adoption of AI across these industries. That's why online education company Udacity is debuting a new way for workers to learn skills needed to be experts in developing artificial intelligence for the likes of IBM and others. Udacity originally launched "Nanodegrees" to train people hoping to land technical jobs, such as software developing. Nanodegrees also aim to teach people about the advanced and emerging technologies like self-driving cars or Android development for mobile phones.


Udacity Partners with WorldQuant to Offer AI for Trading Nanodegree eLearningInside News

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On Thursday, Udacity announced a new AI-based Nanodegree. Developed in partnership with WorldQuant, an international asset management firm, "Artificial Intelligence for Trading" will help learners bring machine learning to financial trading. Until recently, most banks have relied on historical data to map out future market trends. Computer modeling and machine learning algorithms, however, allow analysts to test millions of different scenarios to determine which will lead to the best outcomes. The course comprises of two three-month terms.


You now can get a degree in ... self-driving cars

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Tech columnist Jennifer Jolly takes a spin in a self-driving Ford Fusion and gets the scoop on how the technology works. Mercedes-Benz, whose engineers have been working on self-driving car technology, is eager to increase the size of its engineering team both in Silicon Valley and in Germany. SAN FRANCISCO -- So you say you want join the automotive revolution? Over the past few years, only elite roboticists have been positioned to heed the self-driving car's call to action. Armed with degrees from places such as Carnegie Mellon University and experience at institutions such as NASA, these tech whizzes have been highly sought after by technology and automotive companies looking to build the future.