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Half of U.S. adults are profiled in police facial recognition databases

PCWorld

Photographs of nearly half of all U.S. adults--117 million people--are collected in police facial recognition databases across the country with little regulation over how the networks are searched and used, according to a new study. Along with a lack of regulation, critics question the accuracy of facial recognition algorithms. Meanwhile, state, city, and federal facial recognition databases include 48 percent of U.S. adults, said the report from the Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law. The search of facial recognition databases is largely unregulated, the report said. "A few agencies have instituted meaningful protections to prevent the misuse of the technology," its authors wrote.


Half of US adults are profiled in police facial recognition databases

PCWorld

Photographs of nearly half of all U.S. adults -- 117 million people -- are collected in police facial recognition databases across the country with little regulation over how the networks are searched and used, according to a new study. Along with a lack of regulation, critics question the accuracy of facial recognition algorithms. Meanwhile, state, city, and federal facial recognition databases include 48 percent of U.S. adults, said the report from the Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law. The search of facial recognition databases is largely unregulated, the report said. "A few agencies have instituted meaningful protections to prevent the misuse of the technology," its authors wrote.


China Facial Recognition Database Leak Sparks Fears Over Mass Data Collection

#artificialintelligence

A company that operates facial recognition systems in China has exposed the personal information of 2.5 million people after leaving a database unprotected. Facial recognition system showing a blue interface with a human head and biometrics data, with a grid of relevant points connected to facial features: used for survellaince, privacy control and identity tracking (Big Brother).Getty A company that operates facial recognition systems in China has exposed the personal information of 2.5 million people after leaving a database unprotected, it has emerged. It was discovered by Dutch cybersecurity researcher Victor Gevers, who works for the GDI Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to reporting security issues. He tweeted: "There is this company in China named SenseNets. They make artificial intelligence-based security software systems for face recognition, crowd analysis, and personal verification. And their business IP and millions of records of people tracking data is fully accessible to anyone."


The Ultimate Facial-Recognition Algorithm

The Atlantic - Technology

Human memory is notoriously unreliable. Even people with the sharpest facial-recognition skills can only remember so much. It's tough to quantify how good a person is at remembering. No one really knows how many different faces someone can recall, for example, but various estimates tend to hover in the thousands--based on the number of acquaintances a person might have. Machines aren't limited this way.


Most Australians don't care about being on a mass facial recognition database

Mashable

Last week, the Australian government unveiled its plan for driver's license photos to be included on a national facial recognition database. While there's concern from experts about the erosion of people's privacy and civil liberties, polling by research company Roy Morgan shows that most Australians don't seem to care. SEE ALSO: Apple's facial recognition tech could be coming to iPads next Only 32.5 percent of the 1,486 people surveyed via text message were concerned about mass facial recognition technology, leaving a majority (67.5 percent) unperturbed by the measure. For Tim Singleton Norton, chair of Digital Rights Watch, these results don't come as a surprise. "I think there's a very low public understanding of what the issues are and the ramifications are," he said.