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Samsung CEO apologises for Galaxy S22 app throttling controversy

ZDNet

Samsung's chief executive officer has apologized for the recent controversy around Galaxy S22 smartphone performance being limited by a preinstalled app. During the South Korean tech giant's annual shareholders' meeting on Wednesday, Samsung Device Experience division CEO JH Han said the company failed to appreciate customer concerns over the issue and bowed in apology. Consumer complaints reached a boiling point earlier this month with allegations that the Game Optimisation Service (GOS) app on the Galaxy S22 series was throttling the performance of numerous apps on the phones. In response, Samsung had claimed that GOS only limits the performance of gaming apps and was installed for safety, but issued a software update last week that gave customers an option to prioritise performance. Despite the software update, there have been calls by consumers that they should have the choice to remove the app altogether.


Samsung may be throttling apps to save battery life on Galaxy phones

Engadget

Samsung is looking into reports that it has been limiting the performance of a large number of apps on some Galaxy smartphones, Android Authority has reported. It has reportedly been using something called the Game Optimizing Service (GOS) to throttle up to 10,000 apps (likely to save battery life), including many that have nothing to do with gaming like Netflix, TikTok and Microsoft Office. Making the optics worse is the fact that it's not throttling benchmark apps like 3DMark, GeekBench 5 and PCMark, so you'd see no problem with your device if you ran one of those. Samsung is apparently aware of the issue and is investigating it, according to Android Authority, although it hasn't officially confirmed that yet. The throttling was spotted by Korean users who posted a list of 10,000 apps that are apparently affected.


Samsung's quick fix for Galaxy Note 7 is no full recharge

Associated Press

FILE - In this Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016 file photo, customers wait for recall of their Samsung Electronics Galaxy Note 7 smartphones as powered-off Galaxy Note 7 smartphones are displayed at the company's service center in Seoul, South Korea. Samsung on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016, plans to issue a software update for its recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that will prevent them from overheating by limiting battery recharges to under 60 percent. FILE - In this Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016 file photo, customers wait for recall of their Samsung Electronics Galaxy Note 7 smartphones as powered-off Galaxy Note 7 smartphones are displayed at the company's service center in Seoul, South Korea. Samsung on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016, plans to issue a software update for its recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that will prevent them from overheating by limiting battery recharges to under 60 percent. SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- Samsung plans to issue a software update for its recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that will prevent them from overheating by limiting battery recharges to 60 percent.


U.S. regulators officially recall 1 million Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones

Los Angeles Times

U .S. regulators issued an official recall of Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 phone Thursday because of a risk of fire. Samsung Electronics Co. already voluntarily recalled the devices after a few dozen of them exploded or caught fire. That was out of about 2.5 million phones sold. Now the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is stepping in with a formal recall. Its chairman, Elliot Kaye, blasted Samsung for trying to do the recall on its own, saying that anyone who believes that to be adequate "needs to have more than their phone checked."


Samsung to update software over 'red screen' smartphone

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Samsung is preparing to roll out a software update for its new Galaxy S8 model just days after its release. Customers who received Samsung's new flagship phone were less than happy to find that their devices displayed a peculiar red tinge. Selected consumers who pre-ordered the Galaxy S8 were the first to get their hands on the phone - and were quick to raise the alarm about the unusual glitch. Customers in Samsung's native South Korea thought they were in for an early treat when their Galaxy S8 handsets began to arrive earlier this month. South Korean customers were the first to get their hands on the Galaxy S8.