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Exclusive: Intel's Mobileye gets self-driving tech deal for 8 million cars

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JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Mobileye, Intel Corp's Israel-based autonomous driving unit, has signed a contract to supply eight million cars at a European automaker with its self-driving technologies, a company official told Reuters. Financial terms of the deal and the identity of the automaker were not disclosed. The deal, one of the largest yet for Mobileye, is a sign of how carmakers and suppliers are accelerating the introduction of features that automate certain driving tasks – such as highway driving and emergency braking – to generate revenue while technology to enable fully automated driving in all conditions is still years away from mass-market deployment. The deal for the advanced driver assisted systems will begin in 2021, when Intel's EyeQ5 chip, which is designed for fully autonomous driving, is launched as an upgrade to the EyeQ4 that will be rolled out in the coming weeks, said Erez Dagan, senior vice president for advanced development and strategy at Mobileye. Intel and Mobileye are competing with several rival chip and machine vision system manufacturers, including Nvidia Corp., to provide the brains and eyes of automated cars.


Intel's Mobileye inks deal to supply millions of autonomous vehicles

ZDNet

Intel's Mobileye unit has been awarded a contract to supply millions of autonomous vehicles. According to Reuters, eight million cars will be equipped with self-driving technologies and shipped off to an automaker stationed in Europe. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Erez Dagan, senior vice president for advanced development and strategy at Mobileye told the publication that the contract will come into play in 2021 when Intel's Mobileye EyeQ5 chip is ready. The processor is an upgrade on the upcoming EyeQ4, which is due to be rolled out in the coming weeks.


Intel's Mobileye has a plan to dominate self-driving--and it might work

#artificialintelligence

A lot of media coverage of self-driving technology has focused on a handful of big companies with well-known brands: Google, Uber, Tesla, and GM. But there's another company working on self-driving technology that might ultimately prove even more important. That company is Mobileye, an Israeli startup that was acquired by Intel in 2017. But it has something that's arguably even more important: a dominant position in today's market for advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS). Mobileye had a very public split with Tesla back in 2016, but it continues to do business with a lot of other carmakers.


Intel set to roll out 100 self-driving cars

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Silicon Valley giant Intel on Wednesday announced plans for a fleet of self-driving cars following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye. A day after closing the $15 billion deal to buy Mobileye, which specializes in driver-assistance systems, Intel said it will begin rolling out fully autonomous vehicles later this year for testing in Europe, Israel, and the US. The fleet will eventually have more than 100 vehicles, according to Intel. Silicon Valley giant Intel on Wednesday announced plans for a fleet of self-driving cars following its completion of the purchase of Israeli autonomous technology firm Mobileye. Mobileye's software, which reads inputs from cameras, radar, and laser sensors and makes decisions on what an autonomous car should do.


Intel is testing self-driving cars in 'challenging' Jerusalem conditions

Engadget

Autonomous car makers are running more and more real-world tests, and Intel is now joining the fray, bringing its self-driving cars to the roads of Jerusalem. The company's Mobileye subsidiary, which develops self-driving technology, calls the city home. And since, according to Mobileye CEO Amnon Shashua, Jerusalem has a reputation for aggressive driving, it doesn't seem it will have to go very far to test the limits of the cars' artificial intelligence. Testing in the challenging Jerusalem conditions, Shashua wrote in a blog post, should showcase the cars' ability to make quick decisions. They must react to other drivers and pedestrians who don't use crosswalks without causing slowdowns or accidents.