'Turing's Law' will pardon thousands of men convicted in UK for being gay

PBS NewsHour

A rainbow flag flies with the Union flag above British Cabinet Offices. Thousands of gay and bisexual men convicted under Britain's now-defunct sexual offense laws will be posthumously pardoned. The Ministry of Justice announced the proposed amendment Thursday that would posthumously pardon thousands convicted under those outdated laws. The so-called "Turing's Law" would also allow those who are living to apply to have their names removed from criminal records. Lord John Sharkey, the man behind the amendment, called the development "momentous" and said that of the 65,000 men convicted under the laws, 15,000 are still alive, BBC reported.


Alan Turing to feature on new £50 note

#artificialintelligence

Alan Turing, the scientist known for helping crack the Enigma code during the second world war and pioneering the modern computer, has been chosen to appear on the new £50 note. The mathematician was selected from a list of almost 1,000 scientists in a decision that recognised both his role in fending off the threat of German U-boats in the Battle of the Atlantic and the impact of his postwar persecution for homosexuality. The announcement by the Bank of England governor, Mark Carney, completes the official rehabilitation of Turing, who played a pivotal role at the Bletchley Park code and cipher centre. William Shakespeare was the first historical character to appear on a Bank of England note in 1970. Here's the full list of the historical characters that have appeared on banknotes issued by the central bank in England and Wales over the last five decades.


Alan Turing, codebreaker and mathematician, to be face of Britain's new 50 pound note

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, speaks in front of the concept design for the new Bank of England fifty pound banknote, featuring mathematician and scientist Alan Turing, during the presentation at the Science and Industry Museum in Manchester, north-west England on July 15, 2019. Alan Turing, a mathematician and codebreaker who deciphered German World War II messages, will appear on Britain's new 50 pound note. The Bank of England made the announcement Monday that Turing, who died in 1954, would appear on the currency and some of his work would also adorn the note. The action continues the posthumous accolades for the scientist, who after the war was charged with gross indecency after admitting to having a homosexual relationship, which was illegal at the time in Britain. To avoid imprisonment, he chose chemical castration with female hormones.


New face of the £50 note is revealed

#artificialintelligence

Computer pioneer and codebreaker Alan Turing will feature on the new design of the Bank of England's £50 note. He is celebrated for his code-cracking work that proved vital to the Allies in World War Two. The £50 note will be the last of the Bank of England collection to switch from paper to polymer when it enters circulation by the end of 2021. The note was once described as the "currency of corrupt elites" and is the least used in daily transactions. However, there are still 344 million £50 notes in circulation, with a combined value of £17.2bn, according to the Bank of England's banknote circulation figures.


New face of the £50 note is revealed

#artificialintelligence

Computer pioneer and codebreaker Alan Turing will feature on the new design of the Bank of England's £50 note. He is celebrated for his code-cracking work that proved vital to the Allies in World War Two. The £50 note will be the last of the Bank of England collection to switch from paper to polymer when it enters circulation by the end of 2021. The note was once described as the "currency of corrupt elites" and is the least used in daily transactions. However, there are still 344 million £50 notes in circulation, with a combined value of £17.2bn, according to the Bank of England's banknote circulation figures.