AI Game-Playing Techniques

AI Magazine

In conjunction with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence's Hall of Champions exhibit, the Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence held a panel discussion entitled "AI Game-Playing Techniques: Are They Useful for Anything Other Than Games?" This article summarizes the panelists' comments about whether ideas and techniques from AI game playing are useful elsewhere and what kinds of game might be suitable as "challenge problems" for future research.


IoT and artificial intelligence at Bosch ConnectedWorld Chicago

#artificialintelligence

Until recently, artificial intelligence (AI) was primarily limited to computer chess players and jeopardy. In the last few years, however, the pace of innovation in AI has skyrocketed, driven by tipping points in algorithms, processing (GPUs), and increasing volumes of data. While there is an infinite set of use cases for AI, the Internet of Things is a particularly interesting breeding ground for new AI-driven solutions and experiences, from self-driving cars to intelligent homes to mHealth. In this talk at Bosch ConnectedWorld Chicago, MongoDB's Dev Ittycheria discusses how the massive increase in data driven by sensors will drive the next wave of innovation in AI.


Facebook and MIT Teamed Up to Make an Artificial Intelligence Assistant for Minecraft – TechEBlog

#artificialintelligence

Facebook has teamed up with researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to develop an artificial intelligence (AI) assistant for the world's most popular video game, Minecraft. This isn't an AI that will help you automatically build worlds, but rather one capable of multitasking and helping users with everyday tasks outside a gaming environment. Minecraft was chosen by the researchers because it's currently the most popular game in the world with more than 90-million people playing it every month and it has "infinite variety" yet simple predictable rules. Plus, there's a big opportunity for the AI assistant to learn inside'Minecraft' and help human players to acquire more knowledge outside the game. "The opportunities for an AI to learn are huge, Facebook is setting itself the task of designing the AI to self-improve, the researchers think the'Minecraft' environment is a perfect one to develop this kind of learning," said the report.


I played Shadow of the Tomb Raider over 5G, and it didn't suck

PCWorld

Anyone who's experimented with a cloud gaming service knows that wired ethernet is almost required. At AT&T's Spark conference in San Francisco on Monday, I had a chance to try out Nvidia's GeForce Now service for PCs running over AT&T's 5G service, playing the newly-released Shadow of the Tomb Raider game on a generic Lenovo ThinkPad. The traditional way to run a PC game is locally, running the game off a hard drive or SSD on your PC, using the CPU and GPU to render the game as fast as it can. The downside, of course, is that you have to buy all of that hardware yourself. The trade-off is that the 3D rendering takes place on a remote server--a cheaper solution than buying a high-end graphics card, at least in the short term.


Why bees could be the secret to superhuman intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Louis Rosenberg thinks he has found a way to make us all a lot smarter. Rosenberg runs a Silicon Valley startup called Unanimous AI, which has built a tool to support human decision-making by crowdsourcing opinions online. It lets hundreds of participants respond to a question all at once, pooling their collective insight, biases and varying expertise into a single answer. Since launching in June, Unanimous AI has registered around 50,000 users and answered 230,000 questions. Rosenberg thinks this hybrid human-computer decision-making machine – once dubbed an'artificial' artificial intelligence – could help us tackle some of the world's toughest questions.