Fortnite Superstar Ninja Is Taking His 14 Million Followers From Twitch to Microsoft's Mixer

TIME - Tech

Fortnite superstar Tyler "Ninja" Blevins has left Twitch and is taking his video game live streams to Microsoft's Mixer platform, a stunning switch that could have wide-ranging consequences for the rapidly growing industry. Ninja announced his move Thursday, ending a hugely profitable partnership with Twitch, a live streaming giant owned by Amazon. "I'm incredibly grateful for the opportunities Twitch has provided me," Ninja told The Associated Press. "But as I looked at the next step in my career, I wanted to be somewhere that empowered me to push the boundaries of gaming and achieve bigger goals within the industry. Mixer provides me with more ways to connect with my community."


Ninja shocks gaming world, leaves Twitch for Microsoft's Mixer

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Esports athlete Ninja arrives on the red carpet at Microsoft Theatre on July 10, 2019. Fortnite superstar Tyler "Ninja" Blevins has left Twitch and is taking his video game live streams to Microsoft's Mixer platform, a stunning switch that could have wide-ranging consequences for the rapidly growing industry. Blevins announced his move Thursday, ending a hugely profitable partnership with Twitch, a live streaming giant owned by Amazon. "I'm incredibly grateful for the opportunities Twitch has provided me," Blevins told The Associated Press. "But as I looked at the next step in my career, I wanted to be somewhere that empowered me to push the boundaries of gaming and achieve bigger goals within the industry. Mixer provides me with more ways to connect with my community."


Fortnite star Tfue uses racial slur, but Twitch isn't commenting on rule violation

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for Sept. 4 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Fortnite streamer Taylor "Tfue" Tenney uttered a racial slur during a live broadcast of himself playing Minecraft, in violation of Twitch's policy. In the now-deleted clip from Tuesday night, Tenney can be heard saying, "You guys f---ing killed all the villagers, man. Y'all motherf---ers killed them n----s."


US teenager becomes first Fortnite World Cup champion, winning $3m

The Guardian

Last night, a US teenager who goes by the name Bugha – real name Kyle Giersdorf – became the Fortnite World Cup Champion. The competition began months ago, with waves of qualifiers being selected in weekly online play-ins. A total of 40 million people attempted to qualify for the World Cup, the first esports event of its kind for the mega-hit Fortnite, one of the world's most popular video games. The 100 who made their way to New York this weekend represented 30 different countries. Once there, they faced off in six rounds of the game's last-man standing battles, scoring points for eliminating others or staying alive for as long as possible.


How Ninja was unseated from his Number 1 spot

BBC News

In 2018, Ninja was at the top of this game and untouchable. At his peak Tyler "Ninja" Blevins led video gaming streaming site Twitch with over 200,000 subscribers - people have paid $5, $10 or $25 (£3.84, £7.68 or £19.20) per month to watch him play video games such as Fortnite. But it is now estimated that he has fewer than 30,000 subscribers, leaving him lagging behind gaming personalities such as Shroud, Tfue and Summit1G. So why is Ninja no longer top of the pack? Streaming video games can be a simple hobby, but for those at the top it can be more time intensive than a full-time job.