Goto

Collaborating Authors

Elon Musk's brain chip company Neuralink to begin human trials!

#artificialintelligence

Elon Musk-run brain-machine interface company Neuralink is preparing to launch clinical trials that will implant brain chips in humans. Elon Musk's brain-interface technology company Neuralink may start implanting microchips in human beings from 2022. Neuralink is preparing to launch clinical trials that will implant brain chips in humans. Cofounded by Elon Musk in 2016, Neuralink is working on a chip that would be implanted in our brains to record and stimulate brain activity. This chip is being created for medical applications such as treating serious spinal cord injuries and neurological disorders.


Elon Musk's brain chip startup prepares for first ever human trials

The Independent - Tech

Elon Musk appears close to beginning the first ever human trials of his brain-computer interface technology. A new job posting for a'Clinical Trial Director' at Neuralink reveals that the neurotech startup is preparing to take its brain chip research to the next stage. Neuralink has already conducted trials on pigs and monkeys, including a successful experiment involving a nine-year-old macaque capable of playing video games using only its mind. The firm eventually hopes to use the technology to allow "human-AI symbiosis". Early human trials, which Mr Musk said last month will take place in 2022, will likely involve people with paralysis using Neuralink's interface to gain direct neural control of a computer cursor.


Elon Musk's Neuralink rival Synchron begins human trials of brain implant

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Elon Musk's Neuralink rival Synchron has begun human trials of its brain implant that lets the wearer control a computer using thought alone. The firm's Stentrode brain implant, about the size of a paperclip, will be implanted in six patients in New York and Pittsburgh who have severe paralysis. Stentrode will let patients control digital devices just by thinking and give them back the ability to perform daily tasks, including texting, emailing and shopping online. Although the implant has already been implanted and tested in Australian patients, the new clinical trial marks the first time it will be tested in the US. If successful, the Stentrode brain implant could be sold as a commercial product aimed at paralysis patients to regain their independence and quality of life.


Elon Musk's Neuralink unveils effort to build implant that can read your mind

The Guardian

Elon Musk's secretive "brain-machine interface" startup, Neuralink, stepped out of the shadows on Tuesday evening, revealing its progress in creating a wireless implantable device that can – theoretically – read your mind. At an event at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, Musk touted the startup's achievements since he founded it in 2017 with the goal of staving off what he considers to be an "existential threat": artificial intelligence (AI) surpassing human intelligence. Two years later, Neuralink claims to have achieved major advances toward Musk's goal of having human and machine intelligence work in "symbiosis". Neurolink says it has designed very small "threads" – smaller than a human hair – that can be injected into the brain to detect the activity of neurons. It also says it has developed a robot to insert those threads in the brain, under the direction of a neurosurgeon.


Elon Musk's Neuralink plans to implant chips in human brains to treat neural disorders

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Elon Musk's Neuralink has begun recruiting for a clinical trial director, bringing it one step closer to developing technology that could connect the human mind directly to devices. Neuralink's goal is to build something called a "brain computer interface" that allows people to transmit and receive information between their brain and a computer wirelessly, according to Neuralink's website. For instance, a paralyzed person with a Neurlink chip implanted in their brain could control a mouse and keyboard without moving their limbs. Information could also be transmitted the other way and allow the person's brain to simulate the sense of touch. Neurons in the brain generate electric signals, and electrodes placed nearby neurons can capture and record those signals. While the technology is much more complex, in a simple sense, replaying these signals can simulate the actual sensation of different experiences, such as holding an apple or kissing another person.