Artificial intelligence in business: Separating the real from the hype

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Most of us followed the exciting introduction of the new iPhone X, and there you also saw in the press conference, it's all about machine learning now for face recognition, applied also, machine learning in face recognition to unlock your phone. So, I think we all experience it already with our smartphones, and going forward, we'll see much more of it. Michael Chui: What we're starting to see is these AI technologies underpinning a lot of the things, all the online and mobile services that we're now increasingly taking advantage of. So, for instance, in e-commerce or media, when systems are providing you with suggestions for things you might be interested in, things you might be interested in reading or things you might be interested in buying--the next-product-to-buy use case, as we describe it--increasingly, those types of systems are powered not only by statistical methods, but by some of these AI technologies as well, hopefully bringing consumers closer to the things that they'd be most interested in. Simon London: I'm going to throw one more into the pot there. I'm lucky enough to live in the city of Mountain View in Silicon Valley. There are a surprising number of self-driving cars out on the road.


Artificial Intelligence: The Next Twenty-Five Years

AI Magazine

Through this collection of programmatic statements from key figures in the field, we chart the progress of AI and survey current and future directions for AI research and the AI community. You're on the lookout for fanciful prognostications about technology: Someday computers will fit in a suitcase and have a whole megabyte of memory. And you're wary of lurid Hollywood visions of "the day the robots come": A spiderlike machine pins you to the wall and targets a point four inches behind your eyes with long and disturbing spikes. Your last memory before it uploads you is of it asking, with some alien but unmistakable existential agony, what does this all mean? We are not here to offer a collection of fiction.


Artificial Intelligence: The Next Twenty-Five Years

AI Magazine

Through this collection of programmatic statements from key figures in the field, we chart the progress of AI and survey current and future directions for AI research and the AI community.


What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, advises CXOs on how to approach AI and ML initiatives, figure out where the data science team fits in, and what algorithms to buy versus build. It depends who you ask. Back in the 1950s, the fathers of the field Minsky and McCarthy, described artificial intelligence as any task performed by a program or a machine that, if a human carried out the same activity, we would say the human had to apply intelligence to accomplish the task. That obviously is a fairly broad definition, which is why you will sometimes see arguments over whether something is truly AI or not. AI systems will typically demonstrate at least some of the following behaviors associated with human intelligence: planning, learning, reasoning, problem solving, knowledge representation, perception, motion, and manipulation and, to a lesser extent, social intelligence and creativity. AI is ubiquitous today, used to recommend what you should buy next online, to understand what you say to virtual assistants such as Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Siri, to recognise who and what is in a photo, to spot spam, or detect credit card fraud. AI might be a hot topic but you'll still need to justify those projects.


What is AI? Everything you need to know about Artificial Intelligence ZDNet

@machinelearnbot

It depends who you ask. AI might be a hot topic but you'll still need to justify those projects. Back in the 1950s, the fathers of the field Minsky and McCarthy, described artificial intelligence as any task performed by a program or a machine that, if a human carried out the same activity, we would say the human had to apply intelligence to accomplish the task. That obviously is a fairly broad definition, which is why you will sometimes see arguments over whether something is truly AI or not. AI systems will typically demonstrate at least some of the following behaviors associated with human intelligence: planning, learning, reasoning, problem solving, knowledge representation, perception, motion, and manipulation and, to a lesser extent, social intelligence and creativity. AI is ubiquitous today, used to recommend what you should buy next online, to understand what you say to virtual assistants such as Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Siri, to recognise who and what is in a photo, to spot spam, or detect credit card fraud. At a very high level artificial intelligence can be split into two broad types: narrow AI and general AI.