Brexit is less stressful than losing your smartphone, study finds

The Independent - Tech

British adults feel more stressed about the prospect of losing their smartphone than they do about Brexit, according to a new study conducted by the Physiological Society. The Stress in modern Britain survey asked people to rate how stressful they find – or imagine they would find – 18 different life events, with the Physiological Society using the results to assign an average score to each one from a scale of zero to ten, with zero meaning'Not at all stressful' and ten'Very stressful'. Smartphone loss came 14th on the list, with a score of 5.79, making it more stressful than Brexit (4.23), but slightly less stressful than terrorist threats (5.84). The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. Japan's On-Art Corp's CEO Kazuya Kanemaru poses with his company's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' and other robots during a demonstration in Tokyo, Japan Japan's On-Art Corp's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' performs during its unveiling in Tokyo, Japan Singulato Motors co-founder and CEO Shen Haiyin poses in his company's concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China A picture shows Singulato Motors' concept car Tigercar P0 at a workshop in Beijing, China Connected company president Shigeki Tomoyama addresses a press briefing as he elaborates on Toyota's "connected strategy" in Tokyo.


JetBlue Technology Ventures Selects Silicon Valley-Based FLYR as Its First Strategic Investment - Artificial Intelligence Online

#artificialintelligence

WIRE)–JetBlue Technology Ventures, the new venture capital subsidiary of JetBlue Airways (NASDAQ: JBLU), today announced it has selected Silicon Valley-based travel and data science company, FLYR, as its first investment. The investment was revealed at the unveiling celebration for JetBlue Technology Ventures' new home in Silicon Valley on Thursday evening. FLYR leverages machine learning and predictive analytics to create price forecasts that offer travel customers peace of mind and flexibility when evaluating constantly changing airfares, and provides travel providers with insights and opportunities to increase revenue. "In just a few short weeks, we have heard from hundreds of startups with incredible ideas about the future of travel," said Bonny Simi, president, JetBlue Technology Ventures. "We choose FLYR as our first investment because they share our belief that predictive analytics can provide value to travelers and will change the travel experience in ways we have yet to imagine."


Empathy: The Killer App for Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

When psychologist Dr. Paul Ekman visited the Fore tribe in the highlands of Papua New Guinea in 1967, he probably didn't imagine that his work would become the foundation for some of the latest developments in artificial intelligence (AI). After studying the tribe, which was still living in the preliterate state it had been in since the Stone Age, Ekman believed he had found the blueprint for a set of universal human emotions and related expressions that crossed cultures and were present in all humans. A decade later he created the Facial Action Coding System, a comprehensive tool for objectively measuring facial movement. Ekman's work has been used by the FBI and police departments to identify the seeds of violent behavior in nonverbal expressions of sentiment. He has also developed the online Atlas of Emotions at the behest of the Dalai Lama.


Spotify joins up with Headspace to help people practice mindfulness and meditation

The Independent - Tech

Spotify is looking to make people better, as well as more entertained. The company has launched a new partnership with Headspace, an app meant to help people live "healthier and happier lives". In the new deal, people will be able to suscribe to both of the services for a reduced price. Together, the two apps will sell for £14.99 -- or roughly the same price in other currencies -- rather than the £10 or so that each of them costs. A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Artificial Intelligence Could Help Catch Alzheimer's Early

#artificialintelligence

The devastating neurodegenerative condition Alzheimer's disease is incurable, but with early detection, patients can seek treatments to slow the disease's progression, before some major symptoms appear. Now, by applying artificial intelligence algorithms to MRI brain scans, researchers have developed a way to automatically distinguish between patients with Alzheimer's and two early forms of dementia that can be precursors to the memory-robbing disease. The researchers, from the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam, suggest the approach could eventually allow automated screening and assisted diagnosis of various forms of dementia, particularly in centers that lack experienced neuroradiologists. Additionally, the results, published online July 6 in the journal Radiology, show that the new system was able to classify the form of dementia that patients were suffering from, using previously unseen scans, with up to 90 percent accuracy. "The potential is the possibility of screening with these techniques so people at risk can be intercepted before the disease becomes apparent," said Alle Meije Wink, a senior investigator in the center's radiology and nuclear medicine department.