Digital transformation: online guide to digital transformation

#artificialintelligence

Digital transformation is the profound transformation of business and organizational activities, processes, competencies and models to fully leverage the changes and opportunities of a mix of digital technologies and their accelerating impact across society in a strategic and prioritized way, with present and future shifts in mind. While digital transformation is predominantly used in a business context, it also impacts other organizations such as governments, public sector agencies and organizations which are involved in tackling societal challenges such as pollution and aging populations by leveraging one or more of these existing and emerging technologies. In some countries, such as Japan, digital transformation even aims to impact all aspects of life with the country's Society 5.0 initiative, which goes far beyond the limited Industry 4.0 vision in other countries. In the scope of this digital transformation overview, we mainly look at the business dimension.


17.10.31 AI Is Changing Marketing As We Know It, And That's A Good Thing

#artificialintelligence

It seems nearly impossible for any kind of marketing/advertising industry event or conference to not have at least one (or likely more!) session or panel discussion on the subject. Are we at "peak AI" or is this trend of great interest in the topic set to continue? The AI revolution in marketing, which I'll focus on in this post, has been spurred by the influx of affordable and accessible advanced data analytics tools (typically based on machine learning methods), the availability of increasingly rich (albeit still noisy) and extensive datasets, and a growing acceptance among marketers of the potential power of data-driven approaches to marketing decision making. The winds have been blowing in this direction for some time, so this is not a new phenomenon. However, it seems that now we are at the point where almost everyone is talking about it and (hopefully) thinking hard about how AI can and will change how they do things.


AI Is Changing Marketing As We Know It, And That's A Good Thing

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) seems to be the current business hot topic, including in marketing. It seems nearly impossible for any kind of marketing/advertising industry event or conference to not have at least one (or likely more!) session or panel discussion on the subject. Are we at "peak AI" or is this trend of great interest in the topic set to continue? The AI revolution in marketing, which I'll focus on in this post, has been spurred by the influx of affordable and accessible advanced data analytics tools (typically based on machine learning methods), the availability of increasingly rich (albeit still noisy) and extensive datasets, and a growing acceptance among marketers of the potential power of data-driven approaches to marketing decision making. The winds have been blowing in this direction for some time, so this is not a new phenomenon.


How much Big Data do retailers really need? – RetailWire

#artificialintelligence

Through a special arrangement, what follows is a summary of an article from Retail Paradox, RSR Research's weekly analysis on emerging issues facing retailers, presented here for discussion. A recent RSR survey found half of retailers had implemented capabilities related to capturing and analyzing "Big Data while less than a quarter claimed to be "satisfied" with what they had implemented. So are retailers just in the very early days when it comes to truly leveraging non-transactional data or just too slow to change? Predictive analytics represent a huge leap forward because it takes into consideration not only internal transactional data but path-to-purchase and social data as well as exogenous data like weather, competitive, consumer psychographic profile, calendared events (such as concerts or sporting events), and manufacturer and supply chain data. Consumers want more relevance, and that also means not slogging through mountains of merchandise they don't want to get to the items they do want.


The digital supply network meets the future of work

#artificialintelligence

The increasing power and capability of machines in the digital supply network (DSN) may portend a change in what organizations ask of their workers, in terms of required skills, tasks, and roles. In the coming years, perhaps sooner than later, almost all work will likely involve people working alongside technology or robots they are not currently working with today. Navigating the future of work can be a new and confounding challenge to many supply chain executives who may already be struggling with what their organizations may look like in a novel, more interconnected age. And it can be difficult to identify and prepare for the workforce of the future when the impacts of the DSN on roles and functions are still very much evolving (see the sidebar "A brief look at the digital supply network" to learn more). But with this uncertainty comes the opportunity--and perhaps what many would consider a requirement--to rethink the role of talent in supply chains and discover the potential power of people and machines working together. The addition of advanced technology to a workplace can spur the fear of robots replacing human workers. Certainly, the introduction of advanced technologies could eliminate some tasks and reduce the need for some roles. At the same time, however, it also could lead to the creation of some new tasks and roles. In the United Kingdom, for example, technology has helped to create 3.5 million new jobs between 2001 and 2015, even while it has contributed to the loss of 800,000 other jobs.1